Top Rated Tataki Recipes

Beef Tataki
This is a classic Japanese appetizer that will appeal to many fans of sashimi. This simple preparation highlights the flavors of the meat, with a sauce made from cooked beets, soy sauce, and mirin; the nutty flavor of toasted sesame seeds; and a hint of heat from a pinch of Sichuan pepper. See all beef recipes. Click here to see Bringing a French Revolution to the Home Cook's Kitchen.
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Chef Nina Compton, “Top Chef New Orleans” alum, Saint Lucia’s culinary ambassador and island native, has created a menu that highlights Saint Lucia’s most notable food, chocolate.
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Dish with Diane: Chef Michael Ferraro’s Salmon Tataki
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Dish with Diane — a series all about getting healthy and delicious foods right from world-class chefs themselves, brings you this salmon tataki. Tataki, a Japanese method of preparing fish or meat by quickly searing it over high heat, is the perfect way to make a healthy, quick, and easy dish. Click here for more Dish with Diane: Chef Inspired Healthy with Michael Ferraro. Or click here to watch the video.
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Gyu Tataki
Not only fish, but many foods can be eaten as sashimi: Beef, chicken sasami (tenderloin strip of breast), and even fresh sliced vegetables such as daikon or turnip are lovely raw, thinly sliced, and dipped in soy sauce or ponzu. I crave raw foods, so am naturally drawn to sashimi-style foods. Searing beef tenderloins over a straw fire renders the meat pleasantly cinched up on the surface but virtually raw inside, thus it is imperative to ask the butcher if the meat can be eaten as beef sashimi (gyu sashi). In Japan, the concept of eating raw fish or meat is deeply embedded in how the producers or fisherman treat their meat and fish, therefore many varieties are safe to eat raw. And fishmongers or butchers know their stuff, so you can rely on their expertise. See all beef recipes. Click here to see Japanese Farm Food at Its Finest.
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