Top Rated Stir Fry Recipes

Orange Chicken Stir-Fry
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Why bother going for expensive take-out when you can whip up this Asian favorite in no time?  Simply combine Tyson® Crispy Chicken Strips with a few simple ingredients and you'll have a delicious meal that tastes even better than your restaurant favorite.
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5
Buddakan serves this "rich and tasty" dish at their restaurant over rice. Although the list of ingredients are long, the combination of flavors are worth the length. 
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4.5
Roasted Tofu Stir Fry
Tofu seems to be one of those ingredients that polarizes people — and I think I know why. It's quite simple actually; it's a matter of how the tofu is prepared before it is cooked. Tofu acts like a blank canvas in both texture and flavor. Having worked at a Chinese restaurant for 10 years, I learned the secrets for transforming tofu into an incredible delight. The first trick is to cut the tofu into small cubes and then roast it — this is to give the tofu a crisped exterior so it's ready to soak in the flavors of the sauce it's cooked with. As those of us with a gluten intolerance and sensitivity know, eating Asian foods can be challenging. This recipe requires only one easy swap out — soy sauce — for a great quality wheat-free tamari. My favorite stir fry is made with a dark, spicy, well-balanced sauce with mushrooms and asparagus. Lucky for us, it is spring and asparagus is in season. Having all the ingredients prepared and ready to go makes this dish an easy and fast meal since it cooks so quickly.  Click here to see 10 Vegetarian Recipes.
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4.4
Shirataki Noodle Stir-Fry
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A simple vegan stir-fry that takes just about 15 minutes to prep and cook. Add in whatever vegetables you have on hand, like carrots, baby corn, broccoli, or baby bok choy. Recipe courtesy of Nasoya.
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4
I love a country breakfast on the weekend or a lazy weekday and this andouille sausage and eggs stir fry brings back memories of my french grandfather. On Sunday mornings he would fry together what ever was left in the refrigerator and a pan of potatoes! The house smelled so good we all went running to the kitchen. Miss those amazing mornings but I hold on tight to the memories! I had the best grandparents and they brought so much love to our family and it started every morning in the kitchen! For this recipe and other entertaining tips from Cindy's Table, click here and sign up for my newsletter.
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4
Endlessly Adaptable Stir-Fry Sauce
I probably make this sauce more than any other in the book. When I was in culinary school, we were lucky enough to spend a week learning from Yan Kit So, a wonderful cookbook writer and teacher of traditional Chinese recipes and techniques. I have always loved to cook Chinese food—I made my first dim sum feast at age fourteen. From Yan Kit So, I learned to have a better appreciation of simplicity and how good stir-fry technique can add almost as much flavor as sauce.Since I don’t have room to spell out the entire technique in detail, I’ll remind you of the key points here: Prep your ingredients carefully and keep them separate. Use a hot wok and be ready to shake and rock it. Infuse your hot cooking oil with aromatics, but don’t let them burn. The aromatics you use will greatly influence the taste of the finished dish. Don’t assume that everything will take the same amount of time to cook. Don’t overcrowd the pan. Err on the side of thin sauces rather than thick.This recipe is a simple base that can be easily adapted. I use it as written with delicate fresh-tasting vegetables like snow peas, bok choy, or pea shoots. When I want a bolder sauce, I boost it with a dollop of black bean paste or chile sauce. Cornstarch works well as the thickener, but I prefer potato starch because it seems less gluey and the flavor is quite indistinct. Both starches must reach the boiling point, or they will remain opaque and taste raw and starchy.
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4
Veggie Stir Fry with Peanut Sauce
Looking for a quick and easy dinner idea for Meatless Monday? Try this simple vegetable stir-fry with a rich and creamy peanut sauce.This recipe is courtesy of McKenzie Hall and Nourish RDs.
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4
Ingredients:2 slices Rock fish, cut into cubes3 cloves garlic, minced finely1 tsp chopped fresh red chilies (Thai chili)2 tsp or more fish sauce1/2 tsp palm sugar3 Tbsp fish stocka handful fresh Thai basilMethod:Add 2 teaspoon of fish sauce and some ground pepper to the fish and keep aside.Add a 2 tablespoon olive oil and add minced garlic follow by the red chilies. Then add the fish and half the basil and stir fry for a minute or two.Then add the fish stock, the palm sugar and cook for 2 minutes. Add the remaining basil, adjust seasoning and serve hot with a bowl of rice.
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3.666665
Celery Root in a Chinese Stir-Fry? And How!
January’s toe-numbingly cold weather in New York discouraged long walks to our favorite farmers’ market, and for days on end my wife and I didn’t feel like looking much beyond the refrigerator for ingredients. This was a challenge one evening when we needed a dish to share the menu with Chinese-style red-cooked pork belly drawn from Fuchsia Dunlop’s book Land of Plenty (published in the U.K. as Sichuan Cookery).The least unlikely vegetable in the fridge was a celery root (celeriac). True, it is not commonly used in Chinese cooking, yet it has a fine flavor and, when shredded and eaten raw or cooked as in this recipe, an appealing crunchy texture. Its spheroid form and solidity reminded me of potatoes, which in turn evoked an excellent stir-fry that a Chinese friend used to cook for us: julienned potatoes with chiles (I think she used poblanos, but I could be wrong). The potatoes were left slightly al dente; though underdone potatoes are taboo in most cooking traditions, the thin shreds were delightful to eat, and the potato flavor was somehow heightened by quick cooking.Using celery root in the same way was an experiment that succeeded; absent any fresh chiles, I used a sweet pepper and infused the frying oil with Sichuan peppercorns to add heat and tie the dish to the regional origin of Ms. Dunlop’s red-cooked pork. This worked well in a subtle but palpable way, and the simple, clear-flavored dish provided just what we needed: a contrast with the intense, fat-heavy pork belly. 
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3.666665
Shiitake Mushroom Stir-Fry
This stir-fry recipe is simple and delicious. It's perfect for a quiet night at home, and lunch the next day! See all recipes for mushrooms. Click here to see Bountiful Basil Recipes.
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3.4
Lamb stir-fry
My mom’s stir-fries were a family staple growing up. They were simple for her to make, healthy, and they appealed to my sisters and I because we could add a little more flavor with extra cheese or soy sauce (even coconut milk, on occasion) to the mix. Today, her stir-fries still reign supreme, with the help of some sliced garlic and ginger. But I still revert to my favorite combination when making them at home: pan-seared bits of lamb loin chops atop a bed of brown rice and sautéed or broiled broccoli. Plus, it’s dairy-, wheat-, and corn-free. Don’t like brown rice? You can substitute whatever you like. I’ve made brown rice with coconut oil for extra fluffiness and a creamy bite, and added coconut milk to short grain white rice for something exotic. And don't feel like you only have to use broccoli! Bell peppers, sliced carrot, zucchini, snap peas, and bean sprouts also work well. Starting with bits of chopped garlic and ginger before adding the vegetables makes for a delicious depth of flavor, while if you don’t like lamb, you can choose something else. But for the tenderest result, I swear by removing the meat from loin chops. It’s worth the labor. And if you have dogs at home, they’ll love you if you give them the bones (just supervise to ensure they don’t break pieces off). Click here to see Luscious Lamb Recipes. 
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2.5
Stir-Fry Vegetable Pizza
Chef Anthony Stewart focuses on creating healthy yet delicious meals at Pritikin Longevity Center and Spa, located in Miami, and this easy stir-fry vegetable pizza is sure to refresh and rejuvenate. Feel free to use whatever vegetables you like. For a "meatier" pizza, add cut-up chicken, tofu, fish, or seafood while sautéing the vegetables.
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2.333335