Top Rated Slow Roasted Salmon Recipes

Chef Michael Lomonaco
If you're looking to do something a little different, try chef Lomonaco's slow-roasted salmon with ginger, which actually doesn't take that much time to prepare at all. Start working on the sauce when the salmon goes in the oven, and by the time it's done cooking, the sauce will be ready to spoon on top.
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of Food Network Magazine
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Cooking Index
This recipe is for salmon and halibut steaks about 3/4-inch thick. If you use other cuts, adjust the cooking time according to thickness. Fish is done when the flesh feels firm to the touch.
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TooAllergic
Harmonious. This is close to a recipe from the Victory Garden. The smokey bacon and sweet carrots balance the oily fish and bitter cabbage perfectly.
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From Food Network Kitchens
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David Bonom, Cooking Light NOVEMBER 2005
Cooking the salmon at a low temperature ensures moist results. This is ideal for a dinner party--just serve with hot jasmine tea and offer ginger sorbet for dessert.
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Chef Kate
What could be more Irish than salmon and cabbage and bacon. Recipe from Michael Shlow. Add diced potatoes to the cabbage and you have a complete Irish meal that's a far cry from corned beef and cabbage.
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DrGaellon
Adapted from a recipe by Blake Royer at Serious Eats, which he got from Michael Schlow's cookbook _It's About Time: Great Recipes for Everyday Life_. http://bit.ly/guTzhh
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anon-lae33olij34n@base.google.com (BigOven.com - 150,000+ Recipes)
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Blake Royer
"Try cooking salmon like this, and you might never cook it any other way again," claimed this recipe I found on Global Gourmet, taken from Michael Schlow's cookbook It's About Time: Great Recipes for Everyday Life. I had to put those big words to the test; having cooked salmon by poaching in oil, poaching in water, grilling, roasting, and broiling with a glaze, this method would have to be pretty impressive to beat them all. The slow-cooking of fish is meant to turn the flesh particularly succulent—even custardy—so that it doesn't become dry or crumbly, which happens at higher heats. Poaching in oil is meant to accomplish the same thing, but I'm sure of one thing: Throwing it in a low oven is a lot easier than using cups and cups of oil. Here it's paired with a mixture of cabbage, bacon, and onion, a kind of nod to Alsatian choucroute, which normally features pork, and makes this a satisfying cold-weather dish. It's an interesting pairing with the fish. The fish was indeed wonderful, and I'd recommend this method, though I missed the boost of flavor that comes from high heat and caramelization. But either way, it's a good technique to add to your repertoire.
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Oolala
This is from Cooking Light magazine (not sure which issue). I was going to post all 3 recipes separately but they seem to all go together so here it is.
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