Top Rated Self Rising Flour Recipes

Aussie Sweet Corn Breakfast Fritters with Avocado & Arugula Salad & Sweet Chilli Jam
Peppadew peppers, which are used in this dish, are generally found in a jar near the capers in the supermarket. However, if you can’t find them, just double the cherry tomatoes, along with a bit of Tabasco. Excerpt from Everyday Easy by Lorraine Pascale.
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5
Morton Salt
If you find strawberry shortcake to be a bit too sweet for you, replacing the sponge cake with buttery, flaky homemade biscuits adds a necessary savory element.This recipe is courtesy of Morton Salt.
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4.666665
holes
These are super for when neighbors come by to watch football. No plates or forks required. If quizzed about what they are, just say offhandedly, “Oh, plain old doughnut holes.” Then watch their faces light up as they take their first bite and the fudgy brownie flavor fills their mouths. Guaranteed high fives all around. Because the brownie filling is egg-free, it need not be baked!Recipe excerpted from Sheila G’s Butter & Chocolate: 101 Creative Sweets and Treats Using Brownie Batter by Sheila G. Mains, creator of Brownie Brittle. Click here to purchase your own copy.
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4.5
Spicy Apple Twists
These miniature pastries are a lighter version of old-fashioned apple dumplings.This recipe was the grand prize winner of the Pillsbury Bake-Off Contest in 1958.Recipe courtesy of Pillsbury.Every other winning recipe from the Pillsbury Bake-Off.
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4.5
Apple Pie '63
Julia Smogor won the Bake-Off for her caramel, cream cheese and apple pie.This recipe was the grand prize winner of the Pillsbury Bake-Off Contest in 1962.Recipe courtesy of Pillsbury.Every other winning recipe from the Pillsbury Bake-Off. 
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4.5
Ricotta-Stuffed Zucchini Flowers
The delicate and beautiful zucchini flower was once discarded by many… can you imagine? This is a real stand-alone dish, no accompaniments required — just a glass of wine and an appetite. — Vicky Valsamis, author of The Vegetable: Recipes That Celebrate Nature
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4.5
Hoecakes (fried cornbread)
My grandmother used to make these little cornbread cakes for us, and I love to make them for my grandchildren too. People outside Savannah know them as hoecakes, but we just call them fried cornbread. Whatever name you use, you can’t go wrong with them—everyone loves them, and they’re so easy. They’re great as pancakes for breakfast with a little cane syrup drizzled over them, or alongside a mess of greens, or as an alternative to cornbread or biscuits with lunch or dinner. They have a nice crisp crust on the outside and a soft, sweet corn flavor inside.I like white cornmeal better than yellow for grits or cornbread, and for just about anything. To me, yellow cornmeal and yellow grits have a texture that’s a little too grainy. The yellow also takes longer to cook—a lot of people don’t know that.If you saved the flavorful frying grease from making fried chicken, you’ll be glad you did when you add a spoonful to this batter.This recipe makes a small batch. Double or triple it if you need to feed a big family or a lot of friends. The batter will keep for a couple of days in the refrigerator. Excerpted from A Real Southern Cook in Her Savannah Kitchen, © 2015 by Dora Charles. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. 
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4.18182
rabbit and dumplings
“Most Americans don’t realize that a pound of rabbit meat only has about 800 calories. Additionally, it contains less fat and only about half of the cholesterol of some more commonly used proteins like chicken and pork. Rabbits are one of the most productive domestic livestock animals available. Given the same amount of feed and water, a rabbit can produce roughly six pounds of meat whereas a cow will only produce one pound.” – Chef Anthony Gray of Bacon Bros. Public House in Greenville
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4
Potato-Chip Chicken
This recipe sounds like it might be a joke, but it’s really dynamite. Chicken drumsticks with a potato chip crust—what could be bad? Crunchcrunchcrunch, with tender succulent chicken under the crunch. After I tasted it at my friend Dorothy Lee’s house, I had to get the recipe. It’s fun to make, fun to eat, and as addictive as potato chips. And, of course, kids just love it.You have to use rippled potato chips, and not low-salt or no-salt. Then you’ll salt it all again—but don’t worry, it’s not too salty in the end.Excerpted from A Real Southern Cook in Her Savannah Kitchen, © 2015 by Dora Charles. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. 
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4
As if eating raw cookie dough straight from the package wasn't indulgent enough, someone went and made it even better (and less guilt-ridden, seeing as it's cooked), by deep-frying it. From Taylor Mathis' The Soutern Tailgating Cookbook, these deep-fried cookie dough balls are sure to steal the show, whether at a game or in the comfort of your own home. Click here to see 13 Things You Didn’t Know You Could Fry
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3
Hushpuppies
Does anyone not love hushpuppies? Everyone I know is crazy for these deep-fried cornmeal cakes, and I am too. I like them very crunchy on the outside and light on the inside. Sometimes they can be real sinkers. Not these. They have beer in them, which makes them lighter. Use an electric fryer with a basket or a Dutch oven with a fry basket to make them (see Notes).Some people dip their hushpuppies into all sorts of things, like tartar sauce and soft butter, but I don’t. Excerpted from A Real Southern Cook in Her Savannah Kitchen, © 2015 by Dora Charles. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. 
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2.75
Magic Melting Mocha Cake
This is wickedly good: an airy chocolate cake atop a hidden lake of not-too-sweet chocolate sauce spiked with espresso. Make sure you have a bowl of cold, lightly whipped cream to serve with this, or a stash of vanilla ice cream. — Faith Mason, author of Sheet Pan Magic
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2.333335