Top Rated Roast Chicken Recipes

Roast-Chicken-Dinner Ramen
A good roast chicken is one of the best things you can put in your mouth. And ramen? It should officially replace chicken noodle soup as the most comforting food on earth. Together, they make magic: the undeniably awesome aroma of a bird roasted with garlic, thyme, and sage infused into an umami-packed broth teeming with addictively chewy noodles. Because the dish is essentially just a really good chicken soup, I’d happily eat it with any noodle, from the proper ramenI recommend to thin Chinese wheat noodles, Japanese udon, or fresh fettucine. Even elbow macaroni would hit the spot.Excerpted from the book ASIAN-AMERICAN by Dale Talde with JJ Goode. Copyright © 2015 by Dale Talde, LLC. Reprinted by permission of Grand Central Life & Style. All rights reserved.  
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5
chicken
Roasted chicken is one of my go-to main dishes because it’s easy, versatile, and delicious. By using dark meat the chicken stays deliciously moist and is difficult to overcook; plus it tends to be more budget friendly. A hot oven, some oil, salt, and pepper is all you really need to make some tasty food. I change things up a little bit here by adding some dried herbs—rosemary and thyme in this instance—and a pint of yellow cherry tomatoes. The tomatoes burst in the oven to form a lovely sauce with the herbs and chicken juices to accompany the roasted meat. Pictured here this recipe gets served atop a bed of spinach, but a starch such as rice, potatoes, or pasta would be just as tasty for a heartier meal.For more great recipes like this one, visit The Hungry Hutch.
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5
Roasted Chicken Drumsticks
A few weeks ago, a fellow food blogger, Natalie, and I were discussing our recipe submissions for the National Mango Board’s latest mango cookbook. I filled her in on Mango Breakfast Parfait and she skimmed over her plan for Coconut Mango Jerk Chicken.  When she got down to coconut oil, I questioned its use over butter.  She assured me it would work just the same.Fast forward to last minute dinner party hosting this past weekend.  I rushed through the market, picking up a ton of drumsticks with coconut oil in mind.  And since I just happened to have tested this out earlier in the week, I was confident that {with a few minor adjustments} the main course would be a hit.And it was.  Roasted chicken with herby, crispy skin is one of those minimal effort, majorly impressive kind of dishes, which happen to be the best dishes to have on hand for last minute dinner parties.  And the coconut oil?  Worked like a charm.For more great recipes like this one, visit FoodFash.
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4.5
Cookbook Cover
There are three finesse points to a perfect roasted chicken. Though infinite variables make one roasted chicken different from another (the quality of the chicken, the seasonings used, how long you cook the bird), three main goals are essential if you want to wind up with a perfect roasted chicken. They concern seasoning, oven temperature, and — the most talked about issue but rarely addressed practically — the maintenance of a juicy breast and fully cooked thighs. Seasoning in this case is salt. A chicken should be liberally salted. It should have a visible coating of salt, not just a fey sprinkle. As Thomas Keller put it to me, “I like it to rain down on the chicken.” An aggressive use of salt not only seasons the exterior so the chicken tastes delicious, it also helps dehydrate the skin so that you wind up with a crisp brown skin and not a pale soggy one. Chickens should be roasted in a very hot oven, as hot as your stove and kitchen can take. A hot oven —ideally 450 degrees but at least 425 degrees — accomplishes two important feats: It browns the skin, and it cooks the leg and thigh fast, giving the breast less opportunity to dry out. The most common reason people end up with a dry and flavorless breast is that they fail to address what is happening in the cavity of the bird. If the ends of the legs are not tied together in front of the cavity or if the cavity is empty, hot air swirls around the cavity of the bird, cooking breast from the inside out. To prevent this, you must truss the chicken, which I think is part of the pleasure of roasting a chicken, but something most home cooks don’t want to bother with. If you count yourself among the latter, simply put something into the cavity, preferably something tasty — lemon, onion, garlic, herbs. I repeat: If you don’t want to truss the chicken, stick a lemon in it. Of course, you don’t want to under- or overcook the bird. My experience of roasting a chicken most weeks of the year for the past 20 years is that 1 hour at 450 degrees is perfectly sufficient for a 4-pound bird (50 minutes for a bird under that). But as a rule of thumb, you should use the cavity juices to judge doneness. After 45 minutes, if you tilt the bird so that the juices spill cracklingly into the rendered fat, you will notice that they are red. When you tilt the chicken and the juices that stream out are clear, it’s safe to take the bird out of the oven. Finally, a chicken ought to rest a good 15 minutes before you cut into it. Don’t worry about the chicken getting cold. It won’t. It’s a big, solid bird that retains heat well (touch it after 10 minutes and see for yourself). Click here to see The Perfect Christmas Dinner.  
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4.214285
I had the good fortune of growing up within a 20-minute drive of Los Angeles' Little Saigon, where it was common to find freshly baked baguettes cradling perfect slices of barbecue pork or pâté to the tune of three for $5. I've always wanted to try making my own. However, the gap between my cooking experience and dining experience with Vietnamese cuisine could not be further apart than New York and Saigon. So, when I set out to create my bánh mì, I knew that I could not hope to recreate an traditional version that would do those sandwich shops justice. I set out to create my own version. This recipe aims to be easier and more accessible in terms of ingredients. Instead of barbecue pork or pâté, I used roast chicken (which I made myself, but can easily be substituted with store-bought rotisserie). And in place of the mysteriously addictive butter (MSG anyone?) with equally mysterious ingredients, I made a simple homemade mayo. And lastly mint — bánh mì aficionados might find this strange (I myself have never seen mint in bánh mì before) but mint in general is used often in Vietnamese cuisine, and I think it's a nice touch. But, in the end, I think the most important thing is the bread. The bread still makes the sandwich, no matter what kind of sandwich it is. So make sure to find a truly excellent baguette that makes that crackling sound when you tear off a piece. Click here to see 8 Tasty Lunch Ideas for Work.
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4
Classic and comforting roast chicken and veggies.
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4
Roasted Chicken Thighs
Everyone has a go-to meal right? You know, that meal you make whenever you want something that you know will turn out great every single time. That’s the meal I’m talking about!Well, roasted chicken thighs are my go-to meal. I’ve been making roasted chicken thighs almost once a week for the past few years, in fact. I make this meal whenever I have friends over for dinner, book club meetings, nice Sunday night dinners at home, or an easy week night dinner after a long day at work. It’s an all occasions meal really. Because this roasted chicken thighs recipe is so incredibly easy! As long as you have a cast iron skillet, you are golden.. and your chicken thighs will be too! The skin gets so crispy using this method that it almost tastes like bacon. Almost. The skin is truly the best part. It’s the closest thing you’ll get to fried chicken without actually frying it, which coming from a girl who’s favorite foods used to be bacon and anything fried before going gluten-free, that means something! But, the thigh meat is not to be overlooked – because it is cooked to perfection! Super moist and tender – what more could you ask for!?Next time you need a quick and easy meal that is sure to impress your friends, try this recipe for roasted chicken thighs!For more great recipes like this one, visit A Dash of Megnut.
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4
Tarragon-Roasted Chicken
Roasting a chicken used to be an intimidating concept to me. The bird seemed big, it couldn’t be cooked on the stovetop, and in my mind only a mom, grandma, or some other official adult had the necessary expertise. Then I was commissioned to test a group of recipes, and roasted chicken was on the list. It turns out it isn’t difficult at all. Now I think everyone should know how to roast a chicken, if only to enjoy the head start it gives you on nearly a week’s worth of meals: tacos on Tuesday, chicken salad on Wednesday, and a sandwich on Thursday.What makes this recipe special is the combination of sage, rosemary, lemon, and tarragon stuffed into the bird’s cavity. It smells divine while roasting, and the meat acquires a lush citrus-herb flavor. Roasted Vegetables with Tahini Vinaigrette would be great on the side. You will need a meat thermometer to make sure the chicken is properly cooked. If yours is instant-read rather than traditional, pull the bird out of the oven after 45 minutes and check the temperature in the thickest part of the thigh, avoiding the bone.Excerpted from COOKING SOLO, © 2016 by Klancy Miller. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.
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4
I just love this roasted chicken with mushroom ragout recipe. This is a great paleo recipe and gluten free. For this recipe and other entertaining tips from Cindy's Table, click here and sign up for my newsletter.
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4
Herb roasted chicken
A roast chicken is the perfect ending to a long, stressful day. Enjoy it with some roasted vegetables, or baked potatoes. 
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3.6
Few can resist the succulent, juicy meat and crispy, golden skin of a perfectly roasted chicken. Here's a basic, practically no-fail recipe that's sure to become a family favorite.
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3.5
Antonio’s Roast Chicken
This recipe is from Are We Having Any Fun Yet? by Sammy Hagar. Copyright © 2015 by Sammy Hagar. Reprinted by permission of Dey Street Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.
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3.125