Hamantaschen
This easy hamantaschen recipe has been passed down in my family for generations and traces back to Germany. These festive triangle-shaped cookies offer the perfect sweet bite for breakfast, lunch, or even dinner. They are traditionally filled with lakbar, a thick tangy prune spread (think apple butter but with prunes). Have fun folding and filling these cookies with your favorite jams and jellies — or for an extra treat, try adding a few chocolate chips in the center for a warm gooey filling.
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4.666665
Moroccan cuisine is known for including spices such as cinnamon and cumin and lots of dried fruits. This was my first foray into Moroccan cuisine and I instantly fell in love. Such different combinations than I usually cook with and it was truly delicious.    Recipe from the book Girl Hunter by Georgia Pellegrini. Excerpted by arrangement with Da Capo Lifelong, a member of the Perseus Books Group. Copyright 2011. 
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4.5
Prunes
I will, as I always do, cook duck for Thanksgiving. The reason is the fat. A duck may look slimmer, but when cooked it rarely dries out, while a turkey that’s leaner often does. To choose a leaner meat may be a good idea in general, but I definitely prefer something tastier. Related: A Toast of Trumpets  If you think the duck renders too much fat while baking, I suggest you spoon off the overflow for use in other treats. Potatoes fried in duck fat are heavenly and a duck-fat omelette is marvelous. When done right, duck fat even stores really well. Related: Carmelized Apple Tart  I also recommend using all the parts that come with it. The liver can be chopped up and sautéed with shallots, coriander, and cumin or seasoned with lime and cilantro for a perfect appetizer. The neck (and head and feet) and rest of the giblets make a great base for a stock (see below). This week’s recipe is my own creation, but I learned the baking method from both my mother and Elizabeth David (French Provincial Cooking, 1960). Happy Thanksgiving. — Johanna Kindvall Related: Bacon Cups 
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4
This is an old-timey High Holiday vegetable side dish, sweetened with honey and raisins or prunes and, sadly, often simmered to mushy blandness. To get past that problem, roast the carrots first, to brown them and coax out their natural sweetness, and then bring everything together on the stove top at the end. Sunflower seeds add a nutty note to the chewy prunes and raisins. — Rae Bernamoff
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4
These cookies are dough filled with jam shaped in a triangle to mimic the 3-pointed hat of the monstrous Haman.
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4
rabbit prosciutto
The crisped prosciutto wrapper gives this dish big pork flavor while protecting the rabbit meat so it stays tender and juicy. The sweet prunes and savory ramps or pesto on the inside are a delightful surprise.If you’re planning on using rabbit legs in a stew, braise, etc., you can start the meal with this delicious appetizer made from the leftover loins.Drink Pairing: Viognier WineThis recipe is provided courtesy of Marx Foods.
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4
British culinary master Michel Roux Jr.'s warm and delicious baked apples are perfect for a Christmas-dessert. Serve hot, with chilled crème fraîche or muscavado sugar ice cream.  Wine suggestion: Saussignac, Chateau Tourmentine 1994, J M Hure
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4
These tarts take a while to make, but they are worth every minute. The pastries look like one could easily overindulge, but each small shortbread cookie is a commitment. The fruit syrup is heavy and chewy; our British readers may recognize this dessert as the medieval ancestor of the Jammie Dodger.
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4
Oat Porridge
It's no secret that I love oats. I also love the holiday season! There is something about cuddling up indoors with loved ones that makes me feel so cozy inside. I make this dish throughout the year and it always reminds me of those special celebrations. Click here to see How to Slim Down Your Diet.
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3
"We followed the recipe from A Propre New Booke of Cokery, simply swapping some thick- cut bacon in for the original marrow and letting the rest of the recipe be. The sweetness of the pie comes from the fruit, which dissolves as it cooks, providing a satisfying counterpoint to the tart vinegar and salty bacon. Then the fruit fl avor fades into the background, and what remains is a sweet, rich meat pie with an easy medley of flavors." -From a Feast of Ice and Fire
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2.5