Frankie's red wine prunes
These prunes from Frankies 17 Spuntino may just change your mind about prunes. Stewed in red wine, the slow-cooked prunes melt in your mouth — a slightly tangy contrast to the decadent bed of creamy mascarpone. Reduced red wine syrup covers the plate, coating the mascarpone long after the prunes vanish. The beauty of the dish is its simplicity, yet another example of how Frankies’ dedication to the best ingredients results in spellbinding dishes that don’t require much work. We managed to secure their recipe so you too can master this chilled dessert.
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Pork Loin
Maybe we all have an inner Alsatian peasant longing for a dish just like this. As nights get colder and colder, the fruits of autumn — newly dried prunes, cabbage, and a harvested hog — are woven together with the wild piney flavor of juniper berries. Dried berries work very well, but ripe, juicy juniper berries lend a hint of sweetness that elevates this pork loin dish. Freeze any extra-ripe berries. They freeze beautifully. Adapted from "The Wild Table" by Connie Green and Sarah Scott.
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Gingersnap Prune Cheesecake Bites
Recipe Courtesy of Dawn Jackson Blatner, RD and SunsweetThe flavors of the holidays come together in one delectable bite. These easy-to-make cheesecake bites are the perfect addition to any winter celebration. 
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4.5
Balsamic Prune & Goat Cheese Bruschetta
Recipe Courtesy of Dawn Jackson Blatner, RD and SunsweetThis holiday appetizer is a harmony of flavors. The sweet prune, the tangy balsamic vinegar, the pungent goat cheese, and the bitter arugula make for an irresistible bite.  
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Cookies
These are really impressive and delicious cookies to make if you decide to venture into these deep baking waters! You might want to give yourself a day or 2 to make these as they take quite a bit of time.
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4.5
To sauté pork tenderloins, cut them into rounds (noisettes) about 3/4-inch thick, brown them over high heat, and then continue cooking them until they are firm to the touch. Here, they are served with a sauce made with prunes soaked in wine, a little meat glaze (if you have it), and some cream. 
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This chicken tagine recipe is enlivened with cinnamon and other warming spices. Click here to see 6 Updated Recipes for Rosh Hashanah
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Slow-Cooked Beef Stew With Prunes and Apples
This is the queen of Dalmatian dishes. It takes a long time to prepare — at least one day marinating in good red wine or prošek (Dalmatian fortified wine) and vegetables, and a good 3–4 hours’ braising the next day. It’s often served with potato dumplings or handmade pasta. In Dalmatia, pašticada is usually cooked for big celebrations. It’s an essential dish for weddings, christenings, or other equally important days. In Dalmatia you are considered a great cook if you can make this dish, and my grandmother Tomica was a pašticada expert. Don’t be frightened by this, though — it’s not that hard; it just takes a little time. But don’t forget the most important ingredient: love. — Ino Kuvačić, author of Dalmatia
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beet sorbet
Serve this delicious beet sorbet with a homemade chocolate panna cotta or top your pecan pie with this vibrant, sweet sorbet. This recipe is courtesy of Manoir Hovey in Quebec.
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Flommen Tsimmes Brisket
We always ate this sweet brisket at Pesach and Rosh Hashanah. Originally from my grandmother, who was quite secretive with her recipes, this old family recipe was passed to my mother, who learned it by simply watching and copying, and then to me. Due to ill health, my mother can no longer cook, but we all think and talk about her when I make this dish. It has a particular sweetness for me that goes far beyond its taste. — Jaqui Wasilewsky from The Feast Goes On Click Here to See More Holiday Recipes  
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This skillet-roasted chicken is a great way to revamp the traditional chicken dinner. With a rich sauce of onion, sugar plum, and rosemary, this dish is ripe with herbaceous sweetness to savor.  
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Lamb with Dried Fruits
When dates are being dried, they exude a thick, molasses-like syrup. The Iraqi cook adds some of this syrup when making this dish, but the addition of brown sugar gives a somewhat similar flavor. Click here to see The Definitive Guide to Middle Eastern Cooking.
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