The recipe comes from Chef John Eisenhart of Pazzo Ristorante in Portland, Ore. 
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Noah Fecks
Easy to make, endlessly adaptable, and full of cheese-friendly, concentrated fresh herb flavors, pesto is an indispensable sauce in pairing. Preserved lemon adds a floral quality to this version, in which the bright citrus and herbal flavors tame the sheepy heat of Ricotta Peperoncino. Reprinted from ©The Art of The Cheese Plate by Tia Keenan, Rizzoli, 2016. Photography © Noah Fecks. Click here to purchase your own copy. 
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4.5
Homemade Preserved Lemons
I imagine most of us are familiar with preserved lemons — the sort we associate with Morocco, although it isn’t a process exclusive to North Africa; I have found similar all over Asia and the Americas too. The usual method is to leave whole or almost quartered lemons to steep in heavily salted water or lemon juice. This is extremely simple to do — it just requires a certain amount of patience. Simply top and tail the lemons (or limes, or Seville oranges — you need a fairly acidic fruit for this), then cut a deep cross through each one, almost — but not quite — to the base. Stuff each lemon with sea salt (around 2 teaspoons in each), then pack tightly into a sterilized preserving jar. Weigh the fruit down if possible — I find scalded muslin wrapped around traditional weights or a well-scrubbed tin works — then leave for a couple of days. Remove the weights, muddle the lemons a bit with a wooden spoon to try to release more juice (some will already have collected in the base of the jar), then top with freshly squeezed lemon juice until the lemons are completely covered. Seal, then leave to mature for at least 4 weeks. They can then be kept for over a year in the refrigerator once you have opened them. — Catherine Phipps, author of Citrus For a great recipe that highlights this wonderful ingredient, check out this recipe for Cauliflower Steak with Pine Nuts and Preserved Lemon Variations:You can add aromatics to the lemons when you add the lemon juice. Black peppercorns, cardamom, and bay leaves are all good. For other citrus:You can apply the same method to limes and Seville oranges. In fact, researching this solved a long-standing conundrum for me. I had always wondered what the “lime pickles” in Little Women were: you know the ones — used as currency amongst Amy March’s school friends and the source of a great humiliation when she is forced to throw them, two at a time, out of the classroom window. These, I think, are best cut through into quarters. Add 2 tsp salt per lime and leave to stand in the same way, then cover with lime juice, adding any aromatics. I like mace blades and allspice berries or cinnamon sticks and star anise, perhaps with a few dried chilli (red pepper) flakes sprinkled in. I have made them plain and tried to imagine a group of teenage girls wanting to chew on them, and can almost see it — they are salty, sherbet and mouth-puckering, and will make your mouth go numb in the same way as a bag of Haribo sours. So yes, strangely addictive. Adapted from Citrus by Catherine Phipps (Quadrille, 2017, RRP $29.99 hardcover) 
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4.5
These versatile and flavorful salted lemons can be used for cooking chicken, fish, others meats and in cocktails (especially ones with Negroni). Adapted from "Salted: A Manifesto on the World’s Most Essential Mineral, with Recipes" by Mark Bitterman.
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4.2
Chicken with Asparagus
The subtle flavors of coriander seed and preserved lemon give the chicken and asparagus a lighter spring touch and allow the vegetables a chance to shine. 
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4
This seared tuna makes a striking, sophisticated main course. The spicy preserves are bursting with layers
of flavors from the bold sun-dried tomatoes, the zesty basil, and the sharp garlic. I often prepare the preserves a day or two in advance and store them
in the fridge. I also like to serve this dish as an appetizer by reducing the quantity of tuna. (I still make the same amount of preserves, however, as they always get devoured!) For less spicy preserves, remove and discard the seeds from the jalapeño. If you have more preserves than you need for this dish, they will keep in a tightly capped jar in the fridge for up to one week. Just be sure to serve them at room temperature, not straight out of the fridge.
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Bonne Maman
If there’s one sweet brunch dish that truly reigns supreme, it is the French toast. This indulgent, endlessly delicious recipe is truly French-inspired, with croissants as its base and beautiful fruit preserves mixed in.This recipe is courtesy of Bonne Maman.
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3.75
Preserving Tuna
Growing up, I was indifferent to tuna in a can, but the first time I had canned tuna in Spain, I completely changed my tuna tune. The Spanish are fanatical about their canned seafood, and tuna is no exception. In recent years, high-quality Spanish tuna has become available in the United States; however, it is surprisingly easy to make your own when high-quality yellowfin is available. And as I’ve said earlier, we must be careful to choose the right tuna (i.e., not bluefin). I like to fold preserved tuna with homemade all i oli and sliced cucumbers for a delicious tuna salad sandwich. Even a piece of preserved tuna on toast is great. Or toss it in a salad with cherry tomatoes, feta cheese, walnuts, and arugula. Click here to see Seamus Mullen Shares His Hero Food.
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3.5
Lemon
I just love using preserved lemons to add an intense bit of lemon tartness to dishes, savory or sweet. In many recipes where I call for these, you can substitute lemon zest, but it’s just not the same. Just remember that when you are using lemon rinds, it’s important to remove all of the pith before using, as that’s where the lemon’s bitterness hides and your end result will overpower a dish very easily. Also, you want to cut the lemon peels as thinly as possible. They’re very intense and a little goes a long way!
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3.333335
Preserved Lemons
While it may seem like a shame to pack Meyer lemons in jars of salt and spices, once cured they serve a wealth of purposes. Traditionally, preserved lemons are a condiment in Morocco for tagines or couscous with green olives and root vegetables. I love to stuff them in chicken breasts with goat cheese and fresh herbs or blend them with artichokes and basil for a flavor-packed pesto. If you wanted to toss one into a margarita or michelada, I wouldn’t blame you.  Click here for Recipe SWAT Team: Condiments
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3.25
Wake up to these fall-inspired pumpkin pancakes topped with sweet blueberry preserves.
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2
Bazaar Meat Cauliflower
This healthy, satisfying and delicious cauliflower steak recipe comes from José Andrés' Bazaar Meat at the SLS Las Vegas. Packed full of nutrients and antioxidants, this naturally low-carb entrée is a great alternative to meat.
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