Rather than being chemically leavened by using baking soda or baking powder, or a natural leavening agent like yeast, choux dough is leavened with steam, similar to puff pastry or a croissant. First the dough is baked at a high temperature and then at a low temperature. The initial high temperature is used to create the steam, thus making the dough rise. After the dough is baked, you can cut each ball in half and fill them with ice cream or whipped cream. Since the dough is leavened with steam, you can also carefully poke a hole in the bottom and using a piping bag and small tip to fill each with sweet or savory filling. One of my favorite ways to prepare these is to add Gruyère and Parmesan cheese to the batter after adding the eggs, then filling each baked dough with a mornay sauce. These are delicate and flavorful appetizers that are elegant for any party. Emily Jacobs is the Recipe editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @EmilyRecipes.
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4.5
Don't be intimidated by the fancy French term. Pâte sucrée is just another way of saying "tart crust." Here's a simple recipe that works pretty well for me. See all dough recipes.
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4
Pies and Tarts
The rich flavor, delicate texture, and versatility of pâte brisée have made it the standard at Martha Stewart Living and in this book, where it is used for pies and tarts both sweet and savory. From three main components — flour, fat, and water — plus a little sugar and salt, you get a crust that is incomparably flaky, yet sturdy enough to contain nearly any filling. An all-butter pâte brisée tastes best, but some cooks use shortening or lard for additional tenderness. The name pâte brisée means “broken pastry,” and refers to cutting the butter into the flour, either by hand or with a food processor. The butter-flour mixture should resemble coarse meal, with some pieces of butter the size of small peas, before cold water is drizzled into it; these bits of unincorporated butter give pâte brisée its famously flaky texture by releasing steam as they melt.
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4
Entertaining on Christmas: Chicken Liver Pate with Cranberry Sauce
From the blog http://chatteringkitchen.com December brings with it cold winds, hot fireplaces and the spirit of festivities. Kitchens are fired up to prepare for families and friends, houses are filled with people enjoying the holidays and everyone comes together to share each others joy. What better way to bring a smile on people's faces than through good food. While most tend to concentrate on large lunches and dinners, some shift focus towards canapes and cocktails. Short on time but still want to have people over to rejoice Christmas or simply the holidays, then invite them over for cocktails in the evening or after dinner. Hors de ouevres can be quickly whipped up to excite the palate of your epicure guests. One such December favorite of mine is Liver Pate, a classy and full bodied antipasti, served with melba toasts. Having been a specialty of my mothers', I can still remember the smell that would emanate from the kitchen each time that she would make it. Even though she would not cater professionally, but her famous Liver Pate was ordered by many of her friends for their dinner parties. Famous throughout French and Belgian cuisine, Liver Pate can be made with Goose Liver (Foie Gras), Duck Liver, Pork Liver or Chicken Liver. Since my mother used Chicken Liver most of the time, I adopted her recipe, albeit with a twist - cranberry sauce. A combination that is perfect to serve during the holiday and Christmas season.
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4
This celery root salad is served with charcuterie at Chef Vignau’s Christmas feast.
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4
St. Honoré Cake
This traditional cake incorporates a light dough combined with praline flavors.
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4
This is a really easy Italian dinner to put together, using ingredients that are often sitting in your pantry.  Click here to see more recipes on Cindy's Table.
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4
BBQ Pork Sandwich
A product of French colonialism in Vietnam, this ever so popular sandwich is the perfect combination of east and west. Ideal for a simple lunch or dinner, make the pickled vegetables and BBQ Pork ahead to save on time.
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3
Lemon Tart
This classic lemon tart is perfect any time of year. The best thing about a classic recipe is that it never goes out of style, and this lemon tart is no exception. Top with a little whipped cream, berry coulis, or as we suggest, a warm apricot glaze. For greater precision, we recommend using a digital scale and the original metric measurements. Bon appétit!
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3
This morning I woke up dreaming of jammy, baked figs. When they are ripe and in season, I would happily eat them just as they are (maybe with some cheese and honey). Still, this tart is so autumnal yet bright with summer flavors that I had to give it a try.
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2.633335
Entertaining on Christmas: Chicken Liver Pate with Cranberry Sauce
December brings with it cold winds, hot fireplaces and the spirit of festivities. Kitchens are fired up to prepare for families and friends, houses are filled with people enjoying the holidays and everyone comes together to share each others joy. What better way to bring a smile on people's faces than through good food. While most tend to concentrate on large lunches and dinners, some shift focus towards canapes and cocktails. Short on time but still want to have people over to rejoice Christmas or simply the holidays, then invite them over for cocktails in the evening or after dinner. Hors de ouevres can be quickly whipped up to excite the palate of your epicure guests. One such December favorite of mine is Liver Pate, a classy and full bodied antipasti, served with melba toasts. Having been a specialty of my mothers', I can still remember the smell that would emanate from the kitchen each time that she would make it. Even though she would not cater professionally, but her famous Liver Pate was ordered by many of her friends for their dinner parties. Famous throughout French and Belgian cuisine, Liver Pate can be made with Goose Liver (Foie Gras), Duck Liver, Pork Liver or Chicken Liver. Since my mother used Chicken Liver most of the time, I adopted her recipe, albeit with a twist - cranberry sauce. A combination that is perfect to serve during the holiday and Christmas season.
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2
Sriracha-Marinated Chicken Bánh Mì
Vietnamese bánh mì sandwiches have become so trendy over the past five years that it's almost painful. It's gotten to the point when you see one on a menu that you know before ordering that it's best to stray far, far away from that portion of it. Besides, why order something out that you can make just as well if not better at home. There, I said it. You don't have to be Vietnamese to make a good bánh mì, and it's easy. The basic ingredients for a bánh mì sandwich? Steamed, pan-roasted, or oven-roasted meat and soy fillings like Vietnamese sausage, pork patties, pork liver pâté, and grilled chicken, topped with cucumber slices, cilantro, shredded pickled carrots and daikon, mayonnaise, sliced chiles, and chile sauce. This simple recipe (really simple, I swear) combines two of the above ingredients — chicken (thigh meat) and chile sauce (Sriracha) — for a moist, flavorful effect. The key to great bánh mì? Moist meat. Adequate distribution. Overall moisture. And is just good bread with a thin crust and strategic layering technique for maximum ingredients and efficient distribution. This recipe was carried out using some really terrific bread baked by Leske's Bakery, a Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, original since 1961, and bought at Chubby Mary's, a new favorite sandwich shop by the Artichoke Basille crew in New York's East Village. What's the big deal about the bread? You don't need to go to Leske's or Chubby Mary's (though you could do much worse), but a really light and airy bread that's crusty outside and still moist and airy inside will be key. (Leske's would be great for a po'boy, too, by the way.)  Click here to see 7 Easy Sriracha Recipes.
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2