Top Rated Mizuna Recipes

Thai Beef Salad
The summer going into my junior year of high school, I spent six weeks traveling around Thailand. Other Asian countries offered the same sort of immersion program I was on, so I really couldn’t tell you why I chose Thailand in particular. All I remember is that my dad didn’t want me to go, which turned my idea into an obsession. That was eight years ago, and I have been plotting my return ever since. Until I can carve out a chunk of time to rival my first excursion, I’ve been channeling my interest in Thai culture into the constant cooking and eating (well, mainly eating) of the country’s food. I took my first cooking class ever in Chiang Mai, and when I returned home, I continued to practice my Pad Thai, Spring Rolls, Chicken with Cashew Nuts, Green Curry, and Papaya Salad with the little twine-bound cookbook we had been given at the end of the course. The few dishes not included in its pages were some of my favorites: spicy meat salads like Laab and Yam Neua from Isaan, where I spent two weeks living with a family in a small rice-farming village. Luckily, the flavors could live on in my mind through the many sub-par Thai take-out joints on St. Mark’s Place. But recently, thanks to a contest for your Best Beef Salad on Food52, I began experimenting with a bastardized version of my two favorites — Green Papaya Salad (Som Tum) and Spicy Beef Salad (Yam Neua). The two are usually eaten in tandem at the table, alternated between mouthfuls of sticky rice, and are dressed with the classic Thai combination of lime juice, fish sauce, sugar, and just as much chile as you can stand. Both Som Tum and Yam Neua are usually set atop a small bed of undressed shredded lettuce, which acts more like a garnish than a base. I chose to use mizuna, which is normally found in Japanese cooking, to give the beef an extra peppery bite. — Phoebe
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Hazelnut and Lobster Cannelloni
This recipe's a bit of a project, but it's no ordinary cannelloni recipe. How could it be — the addition of lobster elevates any dish from the normal into something truly special. Hazelnuts make their way into each component of the dish, from the pasta dough, to the filling, vinaigrette, and glaze. See all hazelnut recipes.
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Jorge Rodriguez
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Carianne
Mizuna is a yummy Asian mustard green. Adapted this recipe from www.epicurious.com
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Frank Bonanno, Denver, Colorado
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Melissa Clark
This stir-fry gets its hit of green from bok choy and mizuna, a Japanese salad green.
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dicentra
This is from the Feb 2007 issue of Vegetarian times. They say "Tatsoi cabbage has small, heart-shaped, green leaves that are beautiful in salads. Mizuna, another Japanese green called for in this main-dish salad, has feathery leaves and a peppery flavor. Both are worth seeking out, but if you don’t come across them, simply substitute napa cabbage and watercress."
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Molly Stevens
The classic BLT gets a fresh new spin with crispy pancetta, delicate mizuna, and zesty garlic aioli.
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grizzlybear
Oh yeah this will get that special someone ina great mood.....enjoy
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