Top Rated Jasmine Rice Recipes

Sausage, Egg and Cheese Fried Rice
The sausage, egg, and cheese on a roll is one of those iconic New York foods that, unlike pizza slices, bagels, and dirty-water dogs, you only really get to know if you live here. In that way, it’s like the bodega itself. In fact, the moment I felt like I’d become a real New Yorker was the night I rolled into my bodega and the guy behind the counter finished my order for me. I go, “Sausage, egg, and cheese ...” And before I could finish, he chimes in “... salt, pepper, extra ketchup.”The sandwich, along with its brother, the bacon, egg, and cheese, is generally known as a breakfast sandwich, even though you can order it anytime. I mostly ate it at night on the way back from going out after my shift. It helped me maintain my girlish figure. It became a daily part of my diet the way my mom’s fried rice once was. For me, combining the two wasn’t a stretch — I just swapped one carb for another. You won’t believe how good it is until you try it. My recipe is just a jumping-off point. At Talde, I use Filipino longaniza as the sausage, but any flavorful variety works. You could go Mexican with chorizo and then do Chihuahua cheese instead of American. You could use hot Italian and throw in some bell peppers with the onion and swap in provolone. The only rules are: (1) You’ve got to have hot sauce or something to cut the richness; and (2) Lord help you if you let American cheese cool. It melts like no other, but when it gets cold, it’s like silly putty.Excerpted from the book ASIAN-AMERICAN by Dale Talde with JJ Goode. Copyright © 2015 by Dale Talde, LLC. Reprinted by permission of Grand Central Life & Style. All rights reserved.  
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4.5
Recipe excerpted from The Meat Free Monday Cookbook
 In just a few decades, Thai food has grown from relative obscurity into one of the most popular cuisines on Earth. This vegetable curry has many of its classic tastes and textures.The Meat Free Monday Cookbook edited by Annie Rigg © 2016 Kyle Books, and the photographs © Tara Fisher. Hardcover edition originally published in April 2012. No images may be used, in print or electronically, without written consent from the publisher.
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4.333335
Thai food is really stepping out there for me, especially because I'm sick of my hamburgers-every-night-for-dinner routine. This was the first time I had ever tried duck, and I have to say it was amazing.    Recipe from Sizzling Skillets and Other One-Pot Wonders by Emeril Lagasse.
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4.333335
Clay Pot Catfish with Pickled Carrots and Cucumbers
Here it is, the recipe everyone has been waiting for from season three. Catfish is such a humble fish, a bottom-feeder that can taste muddy if not cooked properly. Christine Ha didn't try to gussy it up with a four-star presentation. Instead, she gently brought out the best in it. She dressed it with some potent Asian flavors — garlic, fish sauce, scallions, and cilantro — and, the magic touch, a little dark caramel that she poured over the fish before braising it in its modest clay pot. This classic technique in Vietnamese cooking brings out the best in a meaty slab of catfish. (If your fishmonger doesn’t have these thicker catfish "steaks," ask for fillets instead.) And her presentation, on a fragrant heap of jasmine rice, with a mound of tangy quick-pickled vegetables, hit all the right notes. Click here to see Cook Like a MasterChef at Home.
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4.142855
This is the perfect summer cookout recipe. Use local and organic ingredients when possible!
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4
Sweet Potato Coconut Curry
This simple curry dish comes together quickly and has a big payoff when it comes to flavor and presentation. Curry powder packs a punch in the spice department and it’s a weapon to  keep on hard for a weeknight dinner when you want to throw together a dish  that varies from your regular  routine. This recipe has just the right balance of sweet and heat, and the sweet potatoes add so much flavor and text that you don’t notice the lack of any meat. (Just ask my husband!) – Kelsey Nixon
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4
Lobster Nam Tok
Nam tok is a Thai dressing often used on grilled meats or fried fish; it's simple to make and pairs well with lobster, too. It's refreshing, zingy, and spicy. Serve with jasmine rice. Click here for more lobster recipes.
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3.5
Shrimp Étouffée
Etouffée means "smothered," as any fan of Cajun cooking knows, and Joshua Marks didn't skip any of the classic vegetables in the sauce that smothered his shrimp. This is a finely honed version of the traditional preparation, and even though a stick of butter may seem generous for a pound of shrimp… well, the dish would miss it if you used less. To get the roux to a medium golden color and cook it properly, you need this volume of butter and flour. And it's true to the spirit of generations of generous, open-handed Cajun cooks, who aren't known for starting a dish with merely a tablespoon or two of butter! Once the wine and stock have gone in, the sauce simmers until it's thick and smooth. At this point, your étouffée is pretty much ready, so don't add the shrimp until the rice is cooked and your guests are seated at the table. It doesn't take long to smother the shrimp once they go in. Click here to see Cook Like a MasterChef at Home.
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3.423075
Butter chicken is a rich, aromatic tomato-based curry made with tender chicken that has been marinated in a spiced yogurt sauce and can be served with steamed jasmine rice and naan. 
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3.333335
Indonesian Fried Rice
This is one of the most popular items at Spice Market. Fried rice is commonly eaten for breakfast in Indonesia, where it is called "nasi goreng," and in some locales it is still served wrapped in a banana leaf. For a truly authentic experience, look for some kecap manis (sweet, thick soy sauce), a popular condiment for many Indonesian dishes, in the international foods aisle or an Asian specialty grocery store.
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3.285715
coconut scented
This is a great recipe that calls for fall flavors. In just no time, you'll have the perfect appetizer. Click here for 15 Asian-Inspired Thanksgiving Recipes
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3
Halibut With Mustard Seeds, Curry Leaves, and Tomatoes
This beautiful dish presents crisp-skinned, fresh white fish in a light and aromatic broth. It is important to use whole spices here, as their flavor is cleaner, lighter, and zingier than ground spices. The tamarind adds a delicate sourness and fresh curry leaves lend an incomparable citrusy and delicately aromatic flavor. Both tamarind and curry leaves are available from Asian food stores and some grocery stores.Excerpted from SPRING by Skye Gyngell by arrangement with Quadrille Publishing, distributed by Chronicle Books, Copyright © 2016 by Skye Gyngell.
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2.5