Top Rated Grits Recipes

Grits
Finding it can be a challenge depending on where you live. You’ll find lots of good choices in the south but diddley in some other regions. Get the best you can in a good local store or anticipate and order stone-ground grits through Amazon.com or direct from one of the sources mentioned in my article. Stone-ground grits will be best, but I recently tested Quaker “Quick Grits,” (not instant) and it was acceptable after I “fixed ‘em up.” There are so many choices. Select yours and follow the directions on the package.  But, here’s what I would do differently. Cook them in low-sodium chicken broth and add no extra salt.  The salt in the packaged low-sodium broth will flavor them nicely. Cook the grits slowly. I find almost all directions result in the liquid cooking off before the grits is ready. If it seems as though your grits has cooked too fast, just add more liquid and keep stirring. Al dente is not good with grits unless you like sand in your food. You want it soft and about the same consistency as slightly loose mashed potatoes. When it is about ready, be creative. Add butter and cheese to your taste. For a large serving or two I use two to three tablespoons of butter and about three ounces of Velveeta. (Yeah, I know, but I believe if you don’t add enough fat to carbohydrates you gain weight on only one side of your body.)  I use a lot of fresh ground black pepper and a few dashes of Tabasco. I know the proportions are right when a smile forces itself onto my face. You can use Velveeta or the cheese of your choice. My pre-vegan wife preferred Cabot’s Monterey Jack with Habanero peppers because she’s a hot babe. Here’s a basic recipe:
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Spicy Shrimp & Cheese Grits
As an impressionable Mississippi lass who wanted to absorb (literally and figuratively) everything I could about cooking, one of the kitchens in which I was most in awe was that of Sissy Eidt, mother of my friend Margaret. Sissy was constantly making casseroles, not only for her family, but also for others in need of edible TLC. And man, could she cook. This dish is a particular favorite. It’s adapted from Ladies’ Legacies in Natchez, a cookbook she co-wrote with her cousin Mary Eidt. This includes shrimp and crumbled bacon, which takes it over the top and on into heaven. From Southern Casseroles, by Denise Gee. 
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Christopher Brown
Pretty in pink, wrought iron, and delicate French doors, Anson recalls the look and feel of New Orleans’s French Quarter, but she is 100 percent Lowcountry. The old gal’s been around or nearly twenty years, but in executive chef Kevin Johnson’s hands, her cuisine tastes as fresh as ever. He refuses to restrict his larder to cliché Lowcountry ingredients like she-crab and okra, while embracing a broad range of locally raised produce for inspiration. “If one of our farmers is growing it, it’s basically in the box. Braised radishes may not necessarily be considered Lowcountry, but if our farmers are growing it, we’ll use it. This has really allowed s to think on a different level for inspiration,” says Kevin.To wit, the former vegetarian brings in a whole pig every week and breaks it down into chops and tenderloins, crafting liver terrines, pork belly, and more. Bacon is cured in-house and shrimp stock is prepared from local shrimp. Whole dried corn grown in South Carolina is delivered and ground in the restaurant’s very own stone gristmill, which separates the ground corn into grits, cornmeal, and polenta. These are used handily in dishes like cornmeal-dusted okra, cornmeal-fried okra, and, of course, Johnson’s memorable take on shrimp and grits, which marries the round mouthfeel of braised pork belly with sweet local shrimp. (Ask your butcher a few days in advance to cut and reserve the pork belly.)Adapted from "The Charleston Chef's Table" by Holly Herrick.
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Elizabeth Karmel is the executive chef of New York City and Washington, DC’s Hill Country Barbecue Market, Hill Country Chicken and the soon-to-be opened Hill Country Barbecue Market Brooklyn 9. A master of the grill, Karmel also knows how to expertly craft soulful dishes using humble Thanksgiving leftovers. She recommends using leftover ingredients to create a delicious breakfast for guests the next morning. 
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Truffled Grits
Inspired by Escaoutoun, a traditional Gascon dish made with cornmeal and cream, this comforting recipe is an Easter favorite. For more delicious Easter Dinner Ideas, click here! From Easter menus and party ideas to the best Easter dinner,dessert, and cocktail recipes, we’ve got you covered. Find all this and more on The Daily Meal’s Easter Recipes & Menus Page.
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"There’s nothing like juicy meat over steaming grits. And the pumpkin in these grits makes them taste like a spicy, comforting bowl of fall flavors. Your family will come running to the table for this one." — Erin Renouf Mylroie, Santa Clara, Utah, of Taste of Home's Recipes Accross America   Click here to see 10 Best Back-of-the-Can Recipes
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Cheese, Bacon and Wheat Germ Grits with Poached Eggs
For a Southern classic with a twist, Kretschmer has added some wheat germ to this hearty dish. Serve these grits with a mixed green salad or fruit salad for a delicious brunch, lunch or even dinner. Click Here for More Poached Egg Recipes
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The menu at this Alabama diner in My Cousin Vinny is the definition of no-frills. Only three items are listed: breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Out-of-towners Vinny (Joe Pesci) and his fiancé (Marisa Tomei) are New York-jaded and thoroughly confused — especially by the ladleful of lard used to grease the flattop. When Vinny asks what’s on his plate, the cook is incredulous: “You never heard of grits?” Heard of them, yes, Vinny’s just “never seen a grit before.” And in his defense, most people from the northeast haven’t. The southern chef recommends simmering the grits in water for 15 to 20 minutes, then serving them with butter. But, to add a bit of tang, we simmer ours in buttermilk, and serve them with goat cheese — plus a six-minute egg, for breakfast.   Click here to see 15 Star-Quality Recipes from Famous '90s Movies
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Eggs
This is a soul-satisfying breakfast best made on a leisurely morning while listening to good, loud music. It won’t take long unless you use stone-ground grits and if you soak the stone-ground grits overnight even those will cook fairly quickly. Click here to see the story What's a Grit? 
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Creamy Grits with Roasted Butternut Squash and Blue Cheese
Oven-caramelized squash and tangy blue cheese make this creamy side hearty enough to double as a vegetarian entrée. It makes an excellent weeknight supper crumbled with crispy bacon or prosciutto and served with a simple green salad and a glass of crisp, sweet sauternes, or creamy chardonnay. See all blue cheese recipes.
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Slow-Cooking Stone-Ground Grits
Stone-ground grits are ground in a stone mill and are much larger than quick- cooking grits. They also have an abundance of flavor compared to the faster-cooking versions. Most Southerners will put them on the stove and cook them for hours, sometimes even all day, while popping in and out of the kitchen to stir. Cooking them in the slow cooker requires no stirring at all. Let them cook all night and wake up to rich, creamy grits. 
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Mexican Shrimp and Grits
This Mexican-inspired twist on a traditional Southern comfort dish is perfect for brunch, lunch, or dinner. Pleasantly chewy hominy stands in for the usual grits, and Mexican chorizo and poblano pepper lends a bit of heat and smokiness to the broth for this dish.
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