Monet Springtime
The 19th century French chef Antonin Carême once said, “The fine arts are five in number, namely:  painting, sculpture, poetry, music and architecture, the principle branch of this latter being pastry.”  This recipe is adapted from “Les 366 menus de Baron Brisse avec 1200 recettes et un calendier nutritive (The 366 Menus of Baron Brisse with 1200 recipes and One Nutritional Calendar)” of 1875. — Maite Gomez-Réjon. Adapted from the ArtBites tour of The Walter Museum. Recipe adapted from "Baking with Julia" by Dorie Greenspan. *Note: Pictured is one of the works of art that inspired this recipe.
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5
"This tart is a favorite dessert at Jacques Pépin’s house. You can make it with any seasonal fruit, such as rhubarb, peaches, cherries, apricots or apples. The dough is buttery, flaky and very forgiving. And it comes together in 10 seconds in a food processor." — FOOD & WINE Magazine; recipe contributed by Jacques Pépin
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Galette dough: 3 Tbsp sour cream (or yogurt or buttermilk) 1/3 cup ice water 1 cup all-purpose flour 1/4 cup yellow cornmeal 1 tsp sugar 1/2 tsp salt 7 Tbsps cold unsalted butter cut into 6 to 8 pieces Method: Mix the cornmeal, flour, salt and sugar together. Stir sour cream with 1/3 cup ice water set aside. In a food processor and the flour mixture and the cold butter pieces and pulse it about 5 to 6 times until butter is about peas sizes. Transfer mixture into a bowl and then add the sour cream mixture little by little. Gather the dough together and divide in half and form it into a disk and wrap in plastic and chill for at least an hour before using. Ingredients for Fillings: 8 asparagus, peeled and sliced thinly diagonally 10 brown mushrooms, sliced thinly 3 cloves of garlic, chopped finely salt and pepper 1/2 cup ricotta cheese 1/4 cup goat cheese 1/8 cup finely grated Parmesan 1/8 cup blue cheese Method: Heat a saute pan, add a little olive oil. Saute the mushrooms for about 4 minutes, turning the mushrooms. Then add the asparagus. Add a pinch of salt and some black pepper. Once slightly soft, remove from pan and let it cool completely. Then add the cheeses and mixed with the saute vegetables. Set aside. Roll out one of the dough into 8 inch disc. Roll up the dough around your rolling pin and transfer it to the prepared baking sheet. Spread savory filling in the middle of the dough and leaving 2 to 3 in. border. Fold the uncovered border of dough up over the filling, allowing the dough to pleat as you lift it up and work your way around the galette. I gave an egg wash and sprinkled the crust with coarsely ground black pepper corn, cumin seeds and fennel seeds and some sea salt. Bake the galette for 35 to 40 minutes or until the pastry is golden and crisp. Transfer the baking sheet to a cooling rack and let the galette rest on the sheet for 10 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature  
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Rustic Peach and Almond Galette
This rustic peach galette is a favorite because it is so simple to prepare, but the combination of almonds, peaches, and some puff pastry can hardly be beat. No fillings or other accoutrements required; no, just juicy, ripe peaches and a flaky pastry. What more do you need?
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4
Apricot Galette
With a tender crust, sweet-tart apricots, and a creamy almond filling, this rustic galette is my take on a classic French dessert. Because it's quite delicate I recommend serving it directly from the baking sheet. Begin your prep several hours in advance to give the dough a chance to chill and the finished tart an opportunity to cool completely.  Click here to see more recipes from Ripe cookbook. 
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This traditional cake also known as King Cake is an almond filling surrounded by puff pastry. A toy or bean is dropped into the filling and baked. The lucky person who finds the toy is king or queen for the day. 
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Galette des Rois
Galette des rois (or King Cake) is a traditional French pastry filled with almond cream. It’s traditionally made in celebration of Epiphany. A small toy or trinket (or, in more traditional versions, a bean) is baked into the cake and whoever’s slice contains the trinket is crowned king for a day. Click here for more about baking.
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4
Pear, Gorgonzola, and Caramelized Onion Galette
It is not often that I make something that I have no name for. Such is the story of this... whatever. I am going to call it a galette. You can call it a tart, my father-in-law called it a pizza. No matter the name, it tastes the same. Creamy, crunchy, and tart, this galette is so versatile. This galette will tempt you from the first bite! This is a great app, side, or dessert with a nice glass of pinot grigio. I used gorgonzola here, but that was because the store I went to was out of Roquefort cheese. You can also use a milder blue cheese if you would like. You can, by all means, make your own crust here but seriously... Do you really have the time? If you do, don't tell me. I don't, so I use store-bought from time to time. Now purists... Don't get your drawers in a bunch. I do make my own crusts and freeze for later use, but during busy family get-togethers, when I am making three of these and a ton of other things, my crust comes from the little blue can. OK? So without further ado... here is my Pear, Gorgonzola, and Caramelized Onion Galette! You're welcome.
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Galette des Rois
This delicious, golden, flaky pastry cake encases an almond cream filling (frangipane). Hidden somewhere within is a china figurine (une fève). Traditionally, the person who finds the fève in their slice of cake is the king or queen for the day, and entitled to wear the paper crown that comes with the cake. Pastry chef Ken Larsen of Brasserie in New York City created this recipe.
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Autumn Pear Galette
A galette is a free-form tart, nothing more than lightly sweetened, thin slices of fresh fruit wrapped in a lazy envelope of pastry dough. You can just roll out the dough and assemble the thing right there on the counter; you don’t have to mess with rolling a perfectly round piece of pastry or transferring the dough to a pie plate (and trying not to cry when it falls apart in your hands, as it so often does). You also don’t have to worry about cornstarch or other thickeners for the filling — with just one layer of thinly sliced fruit, most of the excess juices evaporate during baking. A galette is, by nature, rustic and elegantly imperfect. The nice thing about a galette is that it’s so much easier to make than a pie, and yet so much less ordinary. I’m seeing galettes on dessert menus more often these days… I think the galette might be the new cupcake.
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