Feijoada
Feijoada is the national dish of Brazil, although it can be found in almost all of the countries that were once part of the Portuguese empire. It is based on a bean stew from traditional regional Portuguese cuisine and is a very hearty, filling extravaganza. Like all stews it can be made in advance and reheated when ready to serve which, of course, makes it a great dish to feature when deeply involved in Brazilian literature.Adapted from "A Reader's Cookbook" by Judith Choate.
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brazil
“There are various theories as to the origin of feijoada. Some believe it was created by African- Brazilians during colonial times using leftovers from animal parts; others believe the dish was inspired by European meat and bean stews; and still others say that feijoada first became popular in the favelas (shantytowns) of Rio. Today the origin of feijoada means little to most modern cariocas, but has become a habit on some Saturdays and a desperate craving on others.Saturdays in Rio were made for feijoada. Every Saturday, Hotel Caesar Park serves a stunning version, with various meats presented in many cauldrons, the clay pots that are just as characteristic of the dish as the dish itself, and which lend an earthy taste to the food. A feijoada includes everything your mother ever told you to trim from a piece of meat and move to the side of your plate. This is a dish of bold temptation and prompt surrender for carnivores. It’s hard to eat with much finesse around glistening pounds of pork butt, ham hocks, pig’s ears, and carne seca (dried meat). And that’s one of the things I love most about this dish: you can see into people’s inner personalities when they eat it.” -Chef Leticia Moreinos SchwartzRecipe excerpted from My Rio de Janeiro: A Cookbook by Chef Leticia Moreinos Schwartz. Click here to purchase your own copy. 
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Portuguese Feijoada à Transmontana
The national dish of Portugal has a worldwide following. The basics of the dish — beef, pork and fijão (beans) — is shared by all the country’s former colonies from Brazil to Macau, and you’ll find variations in Angola, Cape Verde, Mozambique, and Goa in India, too. However, Feijoada à Transmontana is considered to be the most traditional of all recipes and the basis for all other feijoadas. It originated in Northern Portugal and has been embraced by Portuguese gastronomes ever since. It’s also a perfect party dish, as the recipe can be expanded to feed any number of guests. This meaty dish combines many Portuguese flavors and spices, which fortunately are commonly found in American kitchens. This is no minute-meal, but your reward for its preparation will be a genuine taste of Portugal in a dish that’s bound to impress.This recipe comes courtesy of Maria Dias of Portuguese Diner.
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Feijoada
Feijoada is a regional, traditional Brazilian dish made with various cuts of beef and pork, typically including sausage, pig's feet, and various other smoked meats. Here, chef de cuisine Abraham Trinidad shares the version he serves at Oficina Latina. Like many great recipes, this one was a collaborative effort.
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