Top Rated Dan Dan Noodle Recipes

Classic Dan Dan Noodles
Addicted as I am to Mr. Xie's Dan Dan noodles, I have to admit that this classic recipe is also glorious. As with the other version, it serves two people, either in one big bowl to share, or in two separate bowls. If you wish, you can blanch a handful of leafy greens in the noodle cooking water and add to the bowl, as shown in the photograph. Click here to see Regional Chinese Cooking Made Easy.
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4.5
Of all Sichuanese street snacks, this one is the best known.
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Joanne Chang
Joanne Chang, owner of Flour Bakery + Café in Boston, sets aside her rolling pin to make stir-fries and noodle dishes like this peanutty dan dan at a second restaurant.
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Alton Brown
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Cooking Light NOVEMBER 2009
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Peter Chang of Tasty 2 in Marietta, GA
Chili oil and Sichuan peppercorns give this dish its distinctive color, flavor, and heat.
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EdsGirlAngie
I love Asian noodle dishes, especially the spicy ones! This one's just hot enough; add more heat if you like. I also like the flavor of both the sesame oil and sesame seeds in this dish, and I toast the seeds until they're nearly brown. This makes a nice and quick side dish for dinner, or a tasty light lunch.
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Food Network Magazine
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Leslie in Texas
Another recipe from the RSVP section of an April 1981 Bon Appetit. It's from the Yenching Palace Restaurant in Washington, D.C.
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J. Kenji López-Alt
This recipes is part of Chinese Restaurant Appetizer Week Perhaps the biggest key to making excellent Dan Dan Noodles is to make your own roasted chili oil. When done right, it get a rich, fruity, smoky flavor that none of the store-bought stuff can touch. It really quite simple. Just toast a handful of whole Chinese chilis (or if you want, red pepper flakes) in a dry skillet until ever-so-slightly smoking. Transfer them to a food processor with a cup of neutral oil, like canola, and whiz the whole thing up. Let it sit in a sealed container in the fridge for a week or so, and you're good to go. You can even top up the jar with more oil and toasted chilis every time you seem to be running low. Make some, have it on hand at all times, and it will revolutionize your mapo tofu, ramen, dumplings, stir-fries, and countless other dishes. Chinkiang vinegar is a dark Chinese vinegar with a mildly sweet flavor. If you can't find it, you can substitute it with an equal-part mix it rice vinegar and balsamic vinegar. Preserve Sichuan Vegetable (zha cai) is pickled mustard root available in cans or jars in most Chinese markets. Carefully remove any dark seeds or stems from Sichuan peppercorns before using. Use only the textured husks. Toast in a dry skillet over medium-high heat until fragrant (about 30 seconds) for best results.
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