Goat Cheese and Chorizo Crostini
This appetizer was no-brainer for me. I love bread. I love cheese (especially of the goat variety). And I love chorizo. Not only is the recipe easy as can be, but it sounds and looks quite sophisticated. In other words: If you want to impress guests but don't cook very often, look no further. Click here to see 11 Easy Appetizer Recipes.
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5
Fava Beans
Fresh beans are readily available during the late summer months, and they are surprisingly easy to cook with. Simply shell the fava beans and cook them for three minutes in boiling, salted water, then transfer them to a bowl filled with ice water to keep them from overcooking.  Click here to see Eat Your Legumes — They're Good for You.
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5
Grilled Shrimp and avocado crostini
Think avocado toast meets bacon wrapped shrimp. This is a fun, easy, satisfying appetizer for your next gathering.
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4.5
Beet and Goat Cheese Crostini
Beets and goat cheese are the ultimate dream team. These crostini are best fresh out of the oven, so don't bring them to a party unless they can be reheated there. See all crostini recipes. Click here to see Just Beet It.
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4.5
Ricotta Crostini
Crostini are the perfect appetizer for passing at parties. Topped with ricotta and sundried tomato pesto, these Italian-style appetizers are sure to please your guests. Recipe courtesy of Vita Coco.
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4
This elegant little appetizer features shiitake mushrooms sautéed with a touch of garlic, shallot, and thyme. Sherry vinegar and wine add depth of flavor.
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4
Pumpkin & Prosciutto Crostini
Fall is a season that calls for a lot of entertaining, and this recipe fits the bill as a party-perfect hors d'oeuvre. The sweetness of the spiced pumpkin purée-ricotta mixture is well-matched with the saltiness of the prosciutto. And good luck holding yourself back from eating too many and ruining your appetite for the main meal. Click here to see the Not Just for Carving: 8 Pumpkin Recipes story. Click here to see The Perfect Christmas Dinner.
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4
I'm on a prosciutto, burrata, and arugula kick lately. I recently had the most amazing prosciutto, burrata, and arugula salad at one of my favorite restaurants and I haven't been able to take my mind off the three ingredients since. These crostinis are my interpretation of that fateful dish, with the much drier mozzarella standing in for its creamy counterpart.  Click here to see 11 Easy Appetizer Recipes.
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4
When I tasted the Uproot sauvignon blanc, my thoughts went straight to the bright spring flavors of this crostini. The wine, bright and crisp, is matched by the zing of lemon; the wine’s gentle grassiness is a nice complement to the green fava beans. A quiet spring evening, a good friend, a plate of crostini, and a glass of Uproot sauvignon blanc are a perfect way to welcome the season.
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4
Spicy Beet-Green Crostini
When I was a child, the only beets I ever saw were the ones that came from a can. Needless to say, I never liked beets. The odor emanating from the can alone used to make me run out of the kitchen as fast as my legs could move. It’s not until I started growing my own vegetables in my early 20′s that I truly discovered beets. They were very easy to grow and if reseeded a couple of times in the season, I could harvest them from late spring all the way to the first snow. They came in all kinds of colors, and best of all, I could eat the roots as well as feast on their luscious green tops. I became a voracious fan of beets! A quick way to prepare the beet greens is to sauté them with garlic and red pepper flakes (I love adding a bit of spiciness to cooked leafy greens — it’s a marriage made in heaven!). Here, I serve these warm beet-green crostini as an hors d’oeuvre or appetizer. Cooked this way, the greens become incredibly tender and flavorful.
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3.457145
A bruschetta (brew-SKET-ta) is one of many variations of toasted bread, olive oil, and garlic from Italy and it is justly popular all over the world. Meant to be eaten as a dish in itself, today a bruschetta is often served with a topping, though then it’s technically a crostino (literally "little crust"). The traditional Roman way of preparing a bruschetta is to cook the bread in oil to toast it, while the Tuscan fett’unta ("anointed" slice) is toasted first, then drizzled with warmed olive oil, not only a little lighter but less work. And I’ve included a version of Italian-American garlic bread that won’t make you expire from garlic poisoning.
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3
While you could bake a whole wheel of Brie until it’s gooey, and then top it with the jam, I find making individual baked brie crostini easier to serve — and easier for my guests to eat!
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2.5