Crepes
A little brandy in the batter sets these light and airy crepes apart. Fill these with your favorite jam, drizzle them with a little melted chocolate, or simply dust them with powdered sugar and cinnamon. Whatever you decide to do, these are definitely a special treat. See all dessert recipes. Loading... jwembed("video_box_player_inner", "refs=540", {"light":"1","width":"413","height":"258","skin":"player/mayamod.zip"} );
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4.5
Crepes are known for their sweet dessert filling, but this Russian crepe recipe is savory and can be stuffed with either pulled pork or chicken. They are a little bit heavier than some other Russian finger foods, but make for a delicious complement to a winter party.
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4
Crepes with Strawberry Compote
These crepes with strawberry compote are an all-time favorite. The sweet strawberries are barely cooked so that they’re still firm but have released their ambrosial juices. A light and exquisite dessert that’s equally lovely for a casual family dinner as for a more sophisticated dinner party… The only thing is, you might want to make a double batch! See all strawberry recipes.
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4
crepes
The rava dosa is nothing but a delectable, crispy and easy to make counter part of the traditional dosa. The rava dosa is usually prepared with fine semolina, rice flour, and all purpose flour. Since the batter doesn't need any fermentation, these crepes can be prepared almost instantly. The addition of onions, chilies and coriander, increases the flavor quotient of the crepes and makes them quite irresistible.
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4
Herbed Egg Crepes
As soon as I saw the photo for thin omelettes in Yotam Ottolenghi's book, Plenty, I was certain they would make a great replacement for crepes. The ones I came up with here are so thin, they resemble crepes, but use no flour, and are wonderfully delicate. You can fill them with almost anything you like; see some examples below. To fill the crepes, spread or layer the fillings over half of each crepe. Fold the other half of the crepe over the filling, and then fold them in half again, forming fan shapes. Heat in a 325-degree oven for about five minutes to warm the filling, or serve at room temperature. Click here to see Make Brunch in 20 Minutes or Less — 10 Recipes.
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3.4
You don’t have to be a native Parisian to make homemade crepes. These crepes are easy, fast, and versatile. I purposely went easy on the sugar here, since they are filled with chocolate and sweetened with blueberries.
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3.25
There are so many reasons to love crêpes. Though beefy buttermilk pancakes have their place at the breakfast table, I find that I often turn to crêpes when I want a meal that's a little bit lighter but no less satisfying. While traditional American pancakes really go best with butter and syrup, it's the thinness of a crêpe that makes it so versatile. For something simple, you can drizzle them with freshly squeezed lemon juice and top with a sprinkling of sugar; they're also delicious when stuffed with filling and folded into a triangle, whether you're craving something sweet (like nutella with banana), or prefer something savory (like chicken, cherry tomatoes, and pesto). These particular crêpes were made with healthy carbs in mind. They're low in sugar, their white flour has been replaced with a mixture of whole-wheat and buckwheat flours, and the accompanying peach compote prominently features a fruit that's known for being a healthy carb. For dieters and non-dieters alike, these crêpes should guiltlessly hit the spot for breakfast, an afternoon snack, or an after-dinner dessert. Click here to see 7 Satisfying Low-Carb Recipes.
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3.25
Crepes Suzette
Cooking French cuisine can be a bit intimidating. I know. Allow Julia Child to influence you and give you the encouragement you need to start. Forget about all the crepes you have had on the streets of Paris or even at the touristy restaurants. Definitely any image you have of crepes made at your local IHOP needs to be forgotten. Instead, try my recipe for an authentic French crepe: thin, light, crispy on the outer edges, and delicately smooth on the inside dressed with homemade orange syrup! Need I say more? See all pancake recipes.
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3
My grandfather was French Canadian and he loved to cook at night in the cast iron pan. He would make us the best crepes and my Nana and I would sit at the table very excited. I do remember a lot of smoke in the kitchen and my grandmother barking orders from the table. (I wonder if that is where I got it from - Just kidding; I don't really do that!)... I wanted to makes a paleo recipe for my friends who are following the paleo diet can enjoy paleo crepes. These are great for breakfast with maple syrup, wrap your favorite breakfast (bacon and eggs), a dessert (folded with strawberries and drizzle melted chocolate or just a night time snack with a cup of tea. Any way you decided to enjoy these paleo crepes I am sure will be perfect!
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3
Breakfast can be satisfying and delicious, too, like with this banana crepe recipe. 
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2.8
I used to use Mark Bittman's recipe for crêpes quite a bit. Then he got all healthy and went vegan before dinnertime. I got mad. I put away How to Cook Everything. Okay, fine, I actually just kind of internalized the recipe after using it so many times for breakfast, and often for dinner too. Savory crêpes make for a nice light weeknight meal. And after you do that first one (which never works out, but primes the pan), they're pretty easy. This recipe is a bit different in that it subsitutes heavy cream for milk. What? I didn't have any milk and I was too tired to go to the store. Going half cream and half water worked just fine. The key here is the butter. Don't forget the butter in your batter! This recipe calls for chicken, morels, and spinach for a light, creamy filling. Click here to see Butter vs. Olive Oil: What's Better?
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2.25
Spiced Crepes
A chilla is a popular Indian snack that’s full of flavor and texture. When the batter is loaded with shredded vegetables, the result is thick and pancake-like. I prefer a thin chilla that’s filled like a crepe. Actually, depending on how you fold a chilla (also spelled cheela), you may have something that looks like a taco or an enchilada. One of the most popular chilla fillings is a mixture of paneer, tomato, and onion. Some modern Indian cooks substitute tofu as a type of "soybean paneer." That approach works really well if you grate super-firm tofu into thick shreds. As the tofu warms up during cooking, it softens to reveal its natural richness, becoming practically indistinguishable from paneer.  Chilla batter is usually made of garbanzo bean flour (besan), available at South Asian, Middle Eastern, and health food markets, or soaked and ground mung beans. I like the ease of using flour and lighten it with rice flour (Asian and non-Asian brands work), which also helps crisp the crepes. Chillas are terrific as snacks but can also be part of a breakfast, lunch, or brunch. Click here to see 5 Unusual Ways to Use Tofu.  
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2