Creole sauce is a hallmark of New Orleans cooking and takes time and a bit of technique to get right. It’s usually mixed with shrimp and served over rice for shrimp Creole, but it can be used to braise anything from green beans to wild game. A good homemade stock and well-made brown roux are essential. Okra isn’t traditional, but I like to add a cupful in with the sautéed vegetables for flavor and thickening. The good news is, except for the final step of sautéing the protein or vegetables, it can be made ahead of time and refrigerated for up to a week or frozen. Once you have this base, you can go in infinite directions.With a quart of Creole Mother Sauce in the refrigerator, a company-worthy dinner is only minutes away. Heat up the sauce while you cook the rice, toss a salad, and heat a loaf of bread. You can simply drop the shrimp into the simmering sauce, but I like to season the shrimp separately and give them a quick sauté to add a little more caramelization.This recipe originally appeared in GW Fins' book, "The Deep End of Flavor," and is reproduced here with permission from Gibbs Smith Publishing.
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4.5
This rice dish is one of the oldest in the traditional New Orleans Creole cook’s repertoire. It shares characteristics with Spanish paëllas, but it has even stronger connections with traditional African rice cookery.Some have speculated that “jambalaya” is a contraction of jambon à la ya-ya — marrying the French word jambon, for ham, with the old African Bantu word ya-ya, for rice.Over the decades, jambalaya has taken on a multitude of identities in South Louisiana. The classic New Orleans dish with shrimp and ham is among the “red” jambalayas, thanks to the presence of tomatoes in it. In many of the Cajun com¬munities to the west of the city, “brown” jambalayas, with oysters, giblets and lusty country sausages, are more familiar.In present-day New Orleans homes, jambalaya’s easy preparation makes it popular party fare, especially during such local celebrations as Mardi Gras.This recipe was originally published in "Ralph Brennan's New Orleans Seafood Cookbook," and is used with permission.
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4.5
Creole Tomato Shrimp Remoulade
Remoulade is traditionally a French condiment, but when you add Louisiana's Creole and Cajun spices into the mix, it becomes something completely different. This recipe take the spicy mayonnaise covered shrimps and stuff it in the center of a large Creole tomato.This recipe is courtesy of Gris-Gris.
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4.5
Creole Seafood Gumbo
Gumbo is a traditional dish native to Louisiana. You can't find a restaurant without this Creole and Cajun stew dish perfectly paired with spicy seasonings and seafood. This recipe is courtesy of chef Danny Trace.
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4.5
Copper Vine's Blackened Redfish
This recipe puts together Creole seasoning, black pepper, lemon juice to create nice 'black' crusted fish fillet. You can choose to either eat as well dressed po'boy sandwich or on its own with some rice. This recipe is courtesy of Chef Mike Brewer from Copper Vine in New Orleans. 
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4.5
Shrimp Etouffee and Grits
You can find the difference between a gumbo and etouffee in its sauce. Etouffee has a much lighter roux compared to the darker sauce in a gumbo. Primarily, etouffee consists of only shellfish.This recipe is courtesy of  Chef Jr. Antonino from Sylvain in New Orleans.
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4.5
Chef Steve McHugh may be a Wisconsin-born chef running an acclaimed San Antonio restaurant (Cured), but he's a New Orleans chef through-and-through. After graduating from the Culinary Institute of America he moved to The Big Easy, where he spent time cooking at restaurants including Dickie Brennan's SteakBacco before goining chef John Besh's team at Best Steak and later his fine dining restaurant August, where he served as chef de cuisine. This is McHugh's recipe for classic New Orleans-style BBQ shrimp, which coats the shrimp in a rich and buttery sauce. 
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4.5
These super addicting pork poppers are from the menu at Chef Brian Landry's Nashville restaurant L.A. Jackson. They are playful, flavorful, and pack a little bit of heat.
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4.5
This cheesy eggplant melt created by chef Marvin Woods for National Dairy Council has New Orleans flavor thanks to the bell peppers and onions. And, since cheese has minimal amounts of lactose, even those who are lactose intolerant can enjoy this dish in moderation.Click here to see more of our best eggplant dishes. 
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4
Ralph Brennan Restaurant's Shrimp Creole
Not to get it confused to gumbo, creole actually used diced or whole tomatoes as it's based. This Louisiana Creole dish combines shrimp into the tomato-based mixture, along with the holy trinity of bell peppers, celery and onions spiced with cayenne and other pepper seasonings. Tastes great over cooked white rice.This recipe is courtesy of Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group.
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3.25
Created by New York City's Kamal Rose and former NFL player Bill Ard, this shrimp recipe is a true representation of its New Orleans surroundings. A dirty rice filled with chicken liver, kidney beans, and aromatics makes it stand out from most versions of the Southern specialty. 
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3.166665
A crawfish boil is a New Orlean's specialty, which is why chef Tony McPhail of the famed Commander's Palace chose to create a recipe for it for Taste of the NFL's event in New Orleans. 
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3.1