Top Rated Convection Oven Recipes

Leek and Onion Scones
Irish chef Catherine Fulvio shares her recipe for savory scones with wilted leeks, onions, and Dubliner cheese. Watch Fulvio's demo here.
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5
Quinoa Sticky Toffee Pudding
Soaked in sweet honey molasses sauce, quinoa flour adds a nutty component to this simple toffee pudding recipe. Recipe courtesy of Harvest executive pastry chef Brian Mercury.Click here to see how to make the Quinoa Sticky Toffee Pudding.
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5
I Am Baker
With a boxed cake mix as its base, this carrot cake is moist, filled with delicious fruits, and (best of all) super easy to make.This recipe is courtesy of ALDI and I Am Baker.
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4.5
Fatayer
I know these delicious meat parcels as fatayer, but the flat version with the same ingredients is called Lahm bil Ajeen, which translated means 'meat with pastry'. These pastries are lamb-based with an infusion of spices that will bounce around your mouth. I know the ingredients list might seem long, but trust me, it only takes about six minutes to get both the pastry and the meat mix ready.Excerpted from the cookbook Palestine on a Plate, by Joudie Kalla.
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4.5
Butternut Squash with Ginger Tomatoes and Lime Yogurt
Roasted wedges of squash and roasted slices of eggplant: these are two bad boys that have been around the Ottolenghi delis and NOPI restaurant for a very long time. Any new player has to have very good credentials to gain the respect of the old-timers and get a shot on the menu. The combination here of sweet roasted squash with lime-fresh yogurt and gingery oven-dried tomatoes was deemed to cut the mustard.Ready-made crispy fried shallots can be found in Asian food stores. If you want to make your own, see the instructions on page 110. They’re a nice addition but, with the crunch already provided by the cashews, the dish can stand well without them, if you prefer.Reprinted with permission from NOPI by Yotam Ottolenghi and Ramael Scully, copyright © 2015. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.
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4
In the English tradition, a cook uses leftover beef or lamb from last night's roast to make this hearty casserole. For the most basic shepherd's pie, you sauté some fresh vegetables, add in meat taken off the bone, and then add any jus or gravy to thicken up the filling and make it a little saucy. You put this filling into an oven-safe casserole dish, top it off with mashed potatoes, dot with butter, and bake until the topping gets a nice roasted brown hue. What you don't know about shepherd's pie is that it is the perfect dish in which to use those Thanksgiving leftovers because there is no set recipe. Your shepherd's pie is based on what's available in the fridge the morning after Turkey Day. Personally, I like to go with very traditional flavors on Thanksgiving, and then go a little cross-cultural with the leftovers. So here is an Asian-inspired take on Shepherd's pie.
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4
Traditional Madeleines
I love watching madeleines bake, the batter rising with the characteristic little bump, pregnant with flavor. It's important not to overbake madeleines; they must be moist. We found when testing these at home that the best way of preventing them from sticking is to thoroughly butter the mold and then refrigerate or freeze the pan to harden the butter before adding the batter. And if your madeleine mold is very old, consider buying a new nonstick one.
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3.666665
Thanksgiving Turkey: Mayonnaise Roasted Turkey
Roasted turkey, brined turkey, dry-brined turkey, healthy turkey, bacon-wrapped turkey, turkey stuffed with stuffing, turkey cooked with compound butter, herbs and spices, smoked turkey, jerk turkey, barbecue turkey, paper-bag turkey, beer-can turkey, turducken, you've tried them all, and of course, you've considered tackling the risks of doing a fried turkey too. You’ve heard of every variation known to man, thought about what temperature to cook the turkey at and for how long, hoped for a moist turkey breast and oohs and ahs from your guests. But when thinking about doing something different, but perhaps not too much more difficult than your traditional Thanksgiving turkey, have you ever considered a mayonnaise-roasted Turkey?Maybe. But probably not.At least, we’ve thought about all the preparations above, but never heard of a mayonnaise-roasted turkey until one member of The Daily Meal staff Sharon Gitelle was inspired by a recipe by Amy of She Wears Many Hats. The photo looked gorgeous; the skin thin, golden and crispy, covered with herbs and healthy crust of salt and pepper. The meat in the picture pulls away from the edges of the legs, the skin is condensed all crispy and crunchy — mayo-crusted turkey skin — like some oil and egg augmented chicharrón-like Turkey gribenes.It had to be experimented with. So, inspired by She Wears Many Hats, and armed with a cause (feeding The Daily Meal’s staff during its inaugural potluck Thanksgiving) we set out undaunted by the idea of trying a first-time recipe as the central dish of a public event. After all, armed with The Daily Meal’s Guide to Thanksgiving, its survival and SOS guides, its guides to temperatures, cooking times, and emergency solutions, how could things go wrong? We used our convection oven, but you can use the turkey cooking times for a conventional oven for the recipe too.And go wrong they didn’t. The following recipe for a 16- to 18-pound turkey was a hit. It was quick. It was easy. It was messy. It was a success. And it was simple too: Mayonnaise, herbs, seasoning, and some celery and onion. That’s all!The turkey breast was as moist 15 minutes after cutting it as it was when Editorial Director Colman Andrews carved it. The skin was crunchy and delicious, and the flavor, well… you didn’t get mayonnaise, but you did get a savory herbaceousness.“Mayonnaise you might ask? Mayonnaise-roasted? That sounds outrageous!”Well, how would it sound if someone suggested they would use an egg glaze and drizzle olive oil over your Thanksgiving turkey? Pretty delicious, right? Well that’s the idea behind this turkey recipe, one that we thank Amy for inspiring and which we tweaked here and there to suit our bird, and maybe this or next Thanksgiving, yours.Arthur Bovino is The Daily Meal's executive editor. Read more articles by Arthur, reach him by email, or click here to follow Arthur on Twitter.
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3.333335
Classic Pound Cake
This recipe was inspired by my mother, Anthesia White. It's exactly the way she would serve it, without any fluff or garnish. This pound cake goes on the menu at my restaurant, FIVE Restaurant, whenever I get homesick. See all dessert recipes. Click here to see the Mother's Day Brunch in Bed story.
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3
Alligator Meatballs
Beef, chicken, fish, or pork? How about alligator? Yes, a little back fat from the pork gives these alligator meatballs the richness that people have come to expect from this comfort-food favorite. Serve them with your favorite sauce for an exciting meal. See all meatball recipes. Click here to see Best Alligator Recipes.
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2.70588
At your next party, rim your cocktail glasses with blueberry salt. It will give your drinks a great presentation — and a sweet and salty finish. You can also use blueberry salt for desserts or to season fruits or summer salads. 
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2.4
Baked Swordfish
This is one of the easiest recipes to make delicious and healthy fish. It is also the way I prefer eating swordfish, as it reminds me of my childhood. My mom would always make it this way at home and when there was swordfish for lunch or dinner I would always be happy. This is a very good dish for children who do not enjoy eating fish too much, as swordfish steaks do not have bones. You can serve it with a simple green or tomato salad.Click here to see 15 Easy Fish Recipes for Summer.
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2.333335