Romani Tea is the same as Russian Tea, and is traditionally served with sugar, lemon, fruit, or jam. According to Hancock, many Russian and Eastern European Romani dishes are the same as the region’s  because the Roma in the East have been settled for so long, whereas Roma in Western Europe were nomadic for longer, so the cuisine is more insular and includes a wide selection of game and foraged vegetables, herbs, and berries. At tea time, my grandmother and I like to read each other’s tea leaves, but this is somewhat unusual among Roma. While the women in her family were traditionally dancers and fortune tellers, for Roma, fortune telling (drabaripé) is just commonsense advice (or Samaritan therapy) for gadjé and is not usually taken seriously within the community. Obviously Roma are not innately born with psychic powers; rather, it’s a trade that was born out of poverty and discrimination and practiced in desperate times. However, Roma do believe in healing magic or rituals, called advising, and practice that within the community. Advisors must be able to speak Rromanes, but because our family lost the language in the Holocaust, we’ve mish-mashed elements of drabaripé and advising: we practice tea leaf reading, palm reading, and card reading alongside meditation and energy healing to treat each other (and sometimes clients) holistically. This is an example of how it’s difficult to make generalizations about Roma — we’re all different, and each family will have its own unique kind of Romani culture (just like everyone else in the world). These “tealeaf afternoons” as my grandmother and I came to call them, are a lovely way to unwind with a loved one and speak frankly about what’s going on in each other’s lives.You will need a teapot, two round shallow-bottom teacups (preferably white or a light solid color inside), two saucers, and two spoons. If you want to read the leaves, find a teapot without a sieve, or you can just spoon some tea leaves from the pot back into the tea once you’ve filled your cup.Read How to Eat Like a Real Gypsy here 
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5
Passion Fruit Roulade
The sharp, citrus flavors in this roulade stop this rich, sweet dessert from becoming too overwhelming.This recipe is courtesy of Nigel Slater.
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4.5
Pears are one of fall's most forgotten-about fruits, but we can't imagine why when there's a juice recipe with pears this good. Made by Marra St.Clair and Lori Kenyon-Farley, certified nutritional consultants and co-founders of USDA-certified organic Ritual Wellness Cleanse, this combination of ingredients is especially good to boost your immunity as the colds and coughs come rolling in. 
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4.5
Maine Lobster Salad with Blood Orange and Tarragon-Citrus Vinaigrette
Start your meal with this fresh salad. If you can’t find blood oranges, substitute with clementines. Serve crisp glasses of grüner veltliner from Austria, which is a great partner for vinaigrette-topped salads. Adapted from a recipe by Samuel Haywood, executive chef and Director of Food and Beverage at The Harraseeket Inn in Freeport, Maine.Click Here to See More Salad Recipes
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Cosmopolitan Recipe
The Cosmopolitan, or Cosmo to its friends, has a hotly debated history. No one knows for sure how and when the martini variation was invented; some credit the New England coast as its birthplace, while others believe that similar variations were made by numerous independent bartenders in the 1970s, but one thing is for sure…there has been a surge in popularity of the drink since it was a staple on the HBO series Sex and the City. Since then, the Cosmopolitan has maintained a girly reputation, and considering it’s lovely pink hue, it’s not hard to see why. Different variations have different colors, but the Cosmopolitan doesn’t stop being pink at heart. To celebrate the Cosmo in all of its glory, here’s how to make a Cosmopolitan.
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This is a one-of-a-kind cocktail that was created in the Bevvy Cocktail Lab. The smoky mezcal and fresh mint in this drink combine and make a perfect, refreshing treat to sip on.This recipe is courtesy of Aubrey Joy Schuster at bevvy.co.
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Summer is winding down, and for most of us that means using up our saved vacation days and heading to the beach for the week. Eating at the beach might not seem ideal, but it can be a great destination for a picnic, so long as you know how to do it correctly. The first thing to remember is to protect your food from the outdoor elements. You never want the sand, wind, or heat to ruin your picnic, so be sure to wrap all of your items in plastic wrap or foil. Liquid dishes such as cold or room-temperature soup are great to bring to the beach because you can keep them in a thermos and they’ll hold up. If you’re getting fancy and want to keep your presentation skills in check, pack sauces or condiments in mini squeeze bottles for easy and safe plating. Kebabs, requiring no silverware, are another great dish to serve at the beach. Wait to assemble them until you get there, though, and be sure to pre-cut all items so it is simple to assemble while on the beach. When you’re ready to sit down into the sand and eat, lay out a fresh towel that’s sand-free and place weights along the corners to keep it weighed down. If you really want to impress your beach buds, my shrimp ceviche is the perfect beach-weather dish that will hold up well in a chilled cooler.
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Grilled Swordfish with Thai Dipping Sauce
For many people, the seductiveness of Thai cooking lies in the careful balancing of basic flavors — sweet, sour, savory, and spicy. This recipe demonstrates these principles without getting into a laundry list of ingredients. The simple dipping sauce in this recipe would go equally well with grilled chicken, steak, or shrimp. Click here to see Cooking with Honey — 8 Great Recipes.
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Yogurt-Orange Blossom Panna Cotta
Try this unique and inspired panna cotta recipe from celebrated pastry chef Johnny Iuzzini of Top Chef: Just Desserts fame. It's a tangy twist on a much beloved Italian dessert, with a bright and refreshing citrus salad on the side, candied pistachios, and a little crunch on the bottom.
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Eggnog
Unfortunately, your average cup of eggnog can really bust your waistline. Not to fear, for there are low-fat eggnog recipes — with skim milk and less cream — that will allow you to sip on this holiday staple without feeling guilty. To enjoy this recipe as a hot drink, prepare it on the stove and serve it immediately after it’s ready.  This recipe is courtesy of Food Network.
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Bloody Mary Ceviche
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The flavors of a classic Bloody Mary cocktail pair well with shrimp. Anthony Lamas, executive chef and owner of Seviche Restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky, shares his brilliant spicy tomato shrimp ceviche recipe here. Click here to watch chef Anthony Lamas make the recipe.
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This easy shrimp ceviche is seasoned with a little lime, lemon, and orange juice, and given texture from avocados, cucumbers, and radishes. 
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2.5