Top Rated Chicken Thigh Recipes

Pad thai
Everyone loves chicken pad thai, Thailand's deliciously spicy noodle dish. The noodles used are rice sticks, which, besides being delightfully chewy, are gluten-free (for those allergic to it) and "cooked" simply by soaking. My version is easier to make than many others — I've eliminated the traditional tamarind, which is hard to find and fussy to prepare — but nothing is lost in the flavor department, I promise. I include the traditional scrambled eggs, but you can omit them, if you like. You'll still have a wonderfully satisfying dish.Click here to see Beam Ming Tsai into the Kitchen.
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Chicken
“This was my sister Heidi’s favorite dish growing up and she taught me how to make it. Many chicken cacciatore recipes call for boneless chicken breasts, but I prefer to use the skin and bones for more flavor. Ultimately you can choose the cuts of chicken you and your family prefer. You can even cut up a whole chicken.” – Maria Rodale, author of Scratch: Home Cooking For Everyone Made Simple, Fun, and Totally Delicious. The Daily Meal is lucky enough to have an exclusive preview of Maria Rodale beautiful cookbook and will be featuring a number of her recipes leading up to the release of her new cookbook, Scratch. She is a passionate cook whose journey took her from learning to feed and nourish her family to exploring the food of other cultures to eventually starting her blog, Maria’s Farm Country Kitchen.Click here to purchase your own copy of Scratch: Home Cooking For Everyone Made Simple, Fun, and Totally Delicious. Available October 11, 2016.
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4.666665
Chicken with Champagne And 40 Cloves Of Garlic
The slow cooking of the garlic makes this dish sweet, nutty, and creamy. Some folks like to cut up a whole chicken, but I prefer all thighs—they braise well and the meat stays juicy. I used Champagne because I love the subtle flavor it adds, but any dry white wine could be substituted.Excerpted from Essential Emeril: Favorite Recipes and Hard-Won Wisdom From My Life in the Kitchen by Emeril Lagasse. Copyright © 2015 Emeril Lagasse dba MSLO Acquisition sub, LLC. Reprinted with permission from Oxmoor House, an imprint of Time Inc. Books. All rights reserved.
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4.5
congee
If you don’t already have cooked rice in your fridge, use 1 1/2 cups of uncooked rice (I usually have jasmine rice at home). You’ll have to extend the cooking time to 1-1/2 to 2 hours but you’ll still be rewarded with a bowl of yummy goodness that is soothing both spiritually and physically. If I have some on hand, I also like to add small cubes of sweet potato toward the end of cooking to add sweetness and texture to the final dish.This recipe is courtesy of theasiangrandmotherscookbook.com
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4.5
Slow-Cooker Moroccan Chicken
Rather than serve this tender chicken marinated in almond butter, cumin, coriander, and ginger with couscous, here the chicken is served with finely diced cauliflower that is studded with dried cherries for sweetness and tossed with fresh herbs, like cilantro and basil. — Angela Carlos, Cook Editor at The Daily MealThis recipe was created by Danielle Walker of Against All Grain for the Almond Board of California.
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4.5
Coq au Vin
We go through a lot of whole, free-range chicken at the restaurant, and I am always searching for ways to use the legs and thighs. Sometimes they end up in sausage or in a small plate to serve in our lounge. But other times, they inspire my version of a classic French bistro dish. Feel free to substitute dry white wine for the red, and you’ll have coq au vin blanc. This recipe is courtesy of Heartland: Farm-Forward Dishes from the Great Midwest cookbook by Lenny Russo and Burgess Lea Press.
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4.5
Martin Brigdale and Somchai Phongphaisarnkit
 Tamarind water adds a sour, zesty taste to curries and other dishes, but you can use lime juice as a substitute — you'll need double the quantity, though. To make tamarind water, take some ripe, sour tamarind fruit, remove the hard outer skin and throw it away. Soak the inner core in hot water for 15 minutes until the pulp can be squeezed to produce the water. The water is normally used immediately, but can be kept in the fridge for a few days. Some villagers in Thailand dry-fry the remaining seeds and eat with salt and sugar as a snack, but this is probably an acquired taste!Recipe excerpted from 50 Great Curries of Thailand by Vatcharan Bhumichitr. Published by Kyle Books. Click here to purchase your own copy.
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4.5
Jambalaya
According to the Hot Mess Kitchen Girls the key is not to wallow in your jealousy, instead you should cook and tell yourself just how not jealous you are.Recipe Courtesy of Gabi Moskowitz and Miranda Berman of the HOT MESS KITCHEN Recipes for Your Delicious Disastrous Life.
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4.5
thai soup
Dried chiles are available at Latin markets; Chinese egg noodles and chili oil are available at Asian markets. All can be found at many supermarkets.This recipe is courtesy of bonappetit.com
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4
Roasted pumpkin seeds thicken this tomatillo-based mole sauce. Serve with a side of rice for soaking up the flavorful sauce. Shred any leftover chicken and serve in warm corn tortillas with sauce spooned on top.
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4
Tex-Mex Chicken with Zucchini
In the mood for a trip south of the border without crossing it? This is the ticket. A little Tex-Mex spiced chicken, a little zucchini and corn, and some diced tomato and cilantro, and it's a meal in a bowl. For an even healthier meal, try using boneless, skinless chicken breasts instead.
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