Top Rated Caper Recipes

Grilled Trout with Capers and Orange
OK, I may be using a bit of poetic license by calling this dish grilled, but if it’s baked on my outdoor grill, doesn’t that make it grilled? Despite the lack of tasty charred lines and smoky overtones, this trout is exquisite. The salty capers and sweet and bright orange is perfect with the trout, adding great flavor without overpowering it. Click here to see the Grilling & Barbecue Guide 2012.
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4.75
Fishcakes with Capers and Horseradish-Parsley Sauce
There are (relatively) complicated ways to make fishcakes, like a method I described some years ago , which involved onions, celery and eggs, and which substituted celery root for the usual potatoes. Those are delicious, and I make something like them every now and again. Yet the basic fishcake – essentially, cooked fish and boiled potatoes smashed together and fried – is a lovely thing, and Jackie and I had a few of them for dinner the other week, with what in her native Britain is called parsley sauce: béchamel containing lots of chopped parsley. It almost goes without saying, however, that I tinkered with both the fishcakes and their sauce: only a little, but it made a difference by lending brightness to a dish that cannot always be said to sparkle. What I did was add capers to the fishcakes and freshly grated horseradish to the sauce. Neither was a stretch: Capers are much used with fish of all kinds, and horseradish is an established partner of cream sauces hot and cold. The fish came from the freezer. I am sometimes ribbed about my restauranty practice of trimming fish into neat portions of nearly uniform thickness. I do this in part because such pieces cook more evenly, but also because I like having the off-cuts in the freezer for things like ... fishcakes. In this case, the fish was hake, which is related to cod and haddock; it is just about ideal for this recipe because it breaks up easily into flakes and because it has enough flavor to fight its way through the potatoes but not so much that it swamps them. Like cod, it benefits mightily from being salted half an hour before cooking, which improves texture and flavor. Here, I use thinner pieces from the tail end; if you are using plumper fillets, add half a minute to the initial simmering time. My proportion of potato to fish (a little heavy on the potatoes) is a family preference; there’d be no harm in using equal weights of these two principal ingredients, but I don’t recommend tipping the balance too far in favor of the fish: Fishcakes are as much a potato dish as anything. Everything apart from the final frying should be done in advance to give the fishcakes time to firm up in the refrigerator.
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4.5
Lemon Caper Grilled Chicken
If you're going with grilled chicken for dinner, odds are you're looking to keep the cooking process nice and simple. That's exactly the philosophy behind this lemon chicken recipe: easy, fast, and delicious. Click here to see the Winner, Winner, Grilled Chicken Dinner story. 
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4.333335
Chicken and Artichokes
Cookbook author and Bon Appétit contributing editor Dede Wilson has made this with boneless, skinless thighs as well as chicken breasts. You can also substitute white wine for the red for a slightly less dark and rich dish. Serve it with rice or steamed potatoes — or, better yet, the next day with crusty bread. 
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4.285715
I was inspired to make this grilled calamari with anchovy and capers after my recent trip to Rome.  My husband and I enjoyed anchovy and capers from Tuscany to Rome and since we love fish I decided to create this perfect dish.  We enjoyed with company as a primi and all shared from the plate.  Of course, you can dip fresh bread in the sauce. I used San Marzano tomatoes from my favorite Italian store Ingredients in Hartford, CT at D&D Market and the calamari came from my favorite fish market in Wethersfield, CT at City Fish, Wethersfield, CT. For this recipe and other entertaining tips from Cindy's Table, click here.
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4
This is a delicious salad that is flexible enough to substitute with spaghetti squash or zucchini noodles — pretty much anything that fits your diet.  Click here to see more recipes on Cindy's Table.
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4
"Meat expert and cookbook author Bruce Aidells creates a fantastic, bare-bones rub for sirloin steak with nothing more than paprika, brown sugar, salt, and pepper. Especially noteworthy is his use of pre-roasted, jarred piquillo peppers to make a quick, easy and delicious sauce." — Food & Wine magazine; recipe contributed by Bruce Aidells
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4
artichoke
I grew up eating whole artichokes with homemade mayo for dipping. These were a treat, something my mother and I would share or, when I was big enough, eat side by side. If we were eating the same head, there would always be a bit of tension when we got down to the heart, the best part. My mother would usually give it to me, after making sure to scrape out all remnants of the choke. I had pictured my death at the hand of an artichoke many times, but so long as there was someone around to double check my cleaning job, the danger only made the heart all the more desirable. I never remembered artichokes as a seasonal treat, but now I realize they must have been. Lately, the markets have been full of them, and when I see a beautiful bin, I can’t help but grab a pair (carefully) for my weekday lunches. Whole steamed artichokes are still one of my favorite meals when I am alone. I remember calling my mother up on the phone the first time I tried to make them myself. And, even a week ago, I’ll admit that I picked up the phone again for her to remind me how best to prepare them without a steamer. She told me to simply use my Dutch oven, and to fill it up with enough water to cover the artichoke’s heart. While my artichoke cooked, I made the mayo from scratch, using fresh scallions and a sprinkle of capers to add a fresh/briny punch. Forty minutes later, my artichoke was ready. It took me less than half the time to devour it, all the way down to the heart, which I cleaned delicately, and then enjoyed all to myself. — Phoebe
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4
Poached Halibut
Halibut is a delicious, juicy fish with a delicate flavor, so you always want to make it the star of the dish. By poaching the halibut in an infused olive oil, you can keep the fish prominent but still pack it with flavor. Check out more Hearty and Healthy Halibut Recipes.
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4
Cucumber Linguine with Mint and Fried Capers
When summer is in full force, cucumbers follow suit in the most overwhelming fashion. Julienned into linguine-size strips and tossed with fresh mint and a zingy vinaigrette, cucumbers here make for a very refreshing — not to mention stylish — appetizer. The fried capers that adorn this simple dish add an irresistible salty bite, a perfect contrast to the slightly sweet cukes. See all linguine recipes.
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2.833335
I only need to read the name of this sauce and I see the fillets of sole in the hot sauté pan, delicate and golden around the edges, the perfect sweet partner for this zesty but elegant sauce. Or, to make a slightly lighter dish, I might cook the sole en papillote — seasoned with salt and pepper, wrapped in parchment (or aluminum foil, let’s make things easy), and baked with no added fat. Bake the packets on a large rimmed baking sheet in a 400-degree oven for five to eight minutes, depending on the thickness of the fish. It’s so simple and delicious. The sauce is also excellent on braised or grilled leeks, or as a dipping sauce for steamed artichoke. Click here to read more about sauces. 
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2.5
Scrambled Eggs
A simple breakfast tastes truly decadent thanks to the inclusion of melted goat cheese and salty capers.This recipe is courtesy of The Londoner.
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2.5