Top Rated Brine Recipes

Middle Eastern Style Pickled Turnips Recipe
The flavor of these delicious and easy-to-make pickles is similar to western-style pickles, but the hot pink color from the beets identifies it immediately as being from the Middle East.
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4.666665
Grilled Butterflied Chicken With Basil and Mint Vinaigrette
This whole grilled chicken recipe starts with a simple brine, which is the key to a juicy bird.This recipe is courtesy of the National Chicken Council.
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4.5
Mirchi Mary
Behind the bar at New York City’s Michelin-starred Junoon, mixologist Hemant Pathak works to complement the kitchen’s ambitious progressive Indian cuisine with equally exuberant cocktails that incorporate many of the same herbs and spices. This vibrant take on the bloody mary adds South Asian flair to the cocktail staple.This recipe is courtesy of Hemant Pathak, the mixologist of Junoon restaurant. To watch a video of Pathak making three cocktails including the Mirchi Mary, click here.
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4.5
Roast turkey kissed with maple and smoke
Finish off this sweet and smokey turkey with smoked salt and ground black pepper to taste. This recipe by Louisa Chu and JeanMarie Brownson appeared in the Chicago Tribune.
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4.5
orange olives
These orangey olives go great on salads, in stews or all by themselves. This recipe is by Leah Eskin and was originally published in the Chicago Tribune.
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4.5
Baked Whole Cauliflower With Indian Spices, Mint and Yo
Ideally you want to brine your cauliflower overnight, but even a couple of hours in brine will work wonders. Look for a small cauliflower and trim only a couple of the outside leaves as you want as many as possible to help protect the cauliflower while it cooks – plus the leaves make great eating. My Indian spice mix is a personal favorite, but you can choose any spices you like. You’ll find many varieties in Asian grocery stores. Try using different yoghurts, too. I love buffalo milk yoghurt for its light texture, and coconut yoghurt works very well if you have dairy allergies. If this is the case you can also replace the clarified butter with olive oil. Additions of sliced fresh chile to add heat and mint for a menthol hit are great twists. — Mike McEnearney, author of Real Food by Mike
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4.5
Banh Mi
This sandwich recipe brings together two cultures. Delicious flavors from pickled vegetables and cold cuts in between a French baguette to create a well-made Vietnamese banh mi sandwich.Courtesy of Simply Vietnamese Cooking
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4.333335
Grilled Shrimp
Add a Japanese-inspired twist to your summer cookout with these shrimp coated in miso butter.This recipe is courtesy of Weekend Table.
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4.1
pork chop
Peaches and pork naturally go hand in hand, and nobody does it better than Matt Abdoo of the Pig Bleeker restaurant. Keep in mind that you have to brine the chops the day before so give youself a little time to prepare with this one.
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4
beet-pickled eggs
Recipe courtesy of Pete & Gerry's.
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3.333335
Fried Chicken
Others may have differing opinions, but this is what we feel is the perfect fried chicken recipe. We took all of the necessary steps, from buying the right chicken and brining it to carefully creating a buttermilk marinade and seasoned flour. It’s juicy, it’s crispy, and it’s delicious — it’s perfect fried chicken. Click here to see How to Make the Perfect Fried Chicken.
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3.130435
Baechu Kimchi
Napa cabbage: The granddaddy of all kimchi. This is the kimchi that people think of when they hear the word kimchi—from taco topper to the cooler case at Ralph’s. There are literally thousands of different kimchi recipes and combinations, tied to the seasons. That said, this recipe is special.Traditionally, napa kimchi is made in the late autumn (October through December) to prepare for the famously harsh Korean winter. The tradition is called kimjang, and back in the day entire communities got together to make it in large batches. We’re talking as much as 100 heads of cabbage at at time, with recipes passed down village to village, generation to generation. But you can certainly make yourself a batch any time during the year if you can find plump and healthy napa cabbage.Buying the cabbage. Look for cabbage that appears healthy and fresh; remove the outer few layers of leaves if anything is browned. At Korean markets, the peeling away of blighted leaves is often done right in the store. The remaining leaves should be tightly packed.The paste and marinade. Next make the rice flour paste (an important binder) and the marinade, which includes an essential ingredient: salted fermented shrimp called saeujeot. While many recipes callfor fish sauce, we feel the salted shrimp add a pronounced flavor that is just too good to omit. Once combined with the cabbage (don’t forget to wear gloves!) and stuffed into glass jars or plastic containers of varying sizes, the waiting game begins.Kimchi is alive and always changing. Kimchi is all about personal taste, and some like their kimchi fresh, while others like it older and funkier. Our general suggestion is to make a large batch (like 6 to 8 heads) and store it in several jars to sample after different time periods. But if you’re new to the kimchi making process, start small with the recipe here and scale up later. After 5 days, pull out a small jar and eat it wrapped in lettuce with a hunk of grilled Kalbi. After 10 days, pull another jar and place on the table with Godeungeo Gui. Keep one in the back of your refrigerator for two months and stew it down in a Kimchi Jjigae. Or, at any age, just snack on it directly from the jar. Give a jar to your best friend or boss or favorite food fan. This is a serious stocking stuffer. Recipe courtesy of Stuart Brioza.Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
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2.5