Top Rated Brine Recipes

bacon
Negroni. Glazed. Bacon. What else do we really need to tell you? Serve this alongside your meats and cheese at a cocktail party (or better yet, sprinkle on top of a Negroni pork shoulder taco). The recipe is courtesy of Tango & Stache, a pop-up culinary experience in San Francisco.
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4.75
Pickleback Shot
Few combinations are more Irish than a good whiskey shot and something green. Celebrate this St. Patrick’s Day with a classic Pickleback shot.This recipe is courtesy of Drizly.
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4.666665
Brined Turkey Breast
Why brine? To guarantee a juicy, melt-in-your-mouth holiday turkey every year. Mix up this easy, five-ingredient brine and let your bird soak up all of the flavor and moisture for 12 to 24 hours. Then, rinse the turkey, season with a savory blend of McCormick® rosemary, thyme and paprika – and roast. Serve on a large platter and watch as guests dig into this memorable main.Recipe courtesy of McCormick
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4.5
Sweet tea is a classic Southern beverage. Use it to brine your chicken for a sweet and satisfying flavor.This recipe is courtesy of Perdue.
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4.5
This whole grilled chicken recipe starts with a simple brine, which is the key to a juicy bird.This recipe is courtesy of the National Chicken Council.
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4.5
Mirchi Mary
Behind the bar at New York City’s Michelin-starred Junoon, mixologist Hemant Pathak works to complement the kitchen’s ambitious progressive Indian cuisine with equally exuberant cocktails that incorporate many of the same herbs and spices. This vibrant take on the bloody mary adds South Asian flair to the cocktail staple.This recipe is courtesy of Hemant Pathak, the mixologist of Junoon restaurant. To watch a video of Pathak making three cocktails including the Mirchi Mary, click here.
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4.5
We’ve heard that brines are important, and this chef’s recipe shakes things up a bit by adding sweet tea to the brine. His tip is to place the turkey and brine in two doubled garbage bags, which allows you to easily brine it overnight in a roasting pan.
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4
turkey
Fried turkey is the answer to a Thankgiving under the gun. There is no need to wake up at the crack of dawn to put the turkey in the oven. Let that bird brine for 36 hours then pop it in a cauldron of hot fat (outside, of course). And you've got turkey on the table in under 2 hours. It's not just any turkey. It has juicy meat all over, even the breasts. Don't feel guilty about the frying, you probably only eat turkey once a year. Serve it with a healthy array of sides if that makes you feel better. You'll need to invest in an outdoor turkey frying kit.For Turkey 35 Ways Gallery, click here.
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4
The Best Turkey Recipe Ever
The pinnacle of the Thanksgiving meal is, of course, the turkey — and we want to make sure that you are fully equipped and prepared to cook it just right. Don’t get wrapped up in Turkey Day chaos. Take a deep breath, relax, and follow this easy recipe to cook a juicy and moist turkey.For Turkey 35 Ways Gallery, click here. 
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3.8125
Brined Turkey
This turkey made its way into chef Craig Deihl’s recipe collection by way of a staff meal at his Charleston restaurant Cypress. He explains that while many people don’t do it on Thanksgiving, the brine is the single most important part of getting a perfectly moist turkey, and adds, "The brine makes the difference between a good turkey and a great one." After trying his recipe, we believe him.Click here to see A Gluten-Free Thanksgiving.For Turkey 35 Ways Gallery, click here.
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3.708335
Basic Turkey
If you decide to brine a turkey, try this simple recipe and play around with the optional ingredients to find what works best for you. This recipe is meant for an 8-10 pound turkey, so if your bird is larger than that, this recipe may need to be doubled or tripled.For Turkey 35 Ways Gallery, click here.
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3.666665
Baechu Kimchi
Napa cabbage: The granddaddy of all kimchi. This is the kimchi that people think of when they hear the word kimchi—from taco topper to the cooler case at Ralph’s. There are literally thousands of different kimchi recipes and combinations, tied to the seasons. That said, this recipe is special.Traditionally, napa kimchi is made in the late autumn (October through December) to prepare for the famously harsh Korean winter. The tradition is called kimjang, and back in the day entire communities got together to make it in large batches. We’re talking as much as 100 heads of cabbage at at time, with recipes passed down village to village, generation to generation. But you can certainly make yourself a batch any time during the year if you can find plump and healthy napa cabbage.Buying the cabbage. Look for cabbage that appears healthy and fresh; remove the outer few layers of leaves if anything is browned. At Korean markets, the peeling away of blighted leaves is often done right in the store. The remaining leaves should be tightly packed.The paste and marinade. Next make the rice flour paste (an important binder) and the marinade, which includes an essential ingredient: salted fermented shrimp called saeujeot. While many recipes callfor fish sauce, we feel the salted shrimp add a pronounced flavor that is just too good to omit. Once combined with the cabbage (don’t forget to wear gloves!) and stuffed into glass jars or plastic containers of varying sizes, the waiting game begins.Kimchi is alive and always changing. Kimchi is all about personal taste, and some like their kimchi fresh, while others like it older and funkier. Our general suggestion is to make a large batch (like 6 to 8 heads) and store it in several jars to sample after different time periods. But if you’re new to the kimchi making process, start small with the recipe here and scale up later. After 5 days, pull out a small jar and eat it wrapped in lettuce with a hunk of grilled Kalbi. After 10 days, pull another jar and place on the table with Godeungeo Gui. Keep one in the back of your refrigerator for two months and stew it down in a Kimchi Jjigae. Or, at any age, just snack on it directly from the jar. Give a jar to your best friend or boss or favorite food fan. This is a serious stocking stuffer. Recipe courtesy of Stuart Brioza.Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
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2.5