At the St. Regis Mexico City, Luxury Is Personal

Contributor
If Mexico City’s many fantastic sights weren’t so close to the hotel, you’d never want to leave

Carrie Vibert

The chicken chilaquiles at Diana Restaurant in the St. Regis Mexico City is a must before any day of sightseeing.

From the moment I entered Mexico, I felt special. The good kind of special, where someone thinks you’re important. It started with a driver sent from The St. Regis Hotel Mexico City waiting in the airport with a placard with my name on it. After I exited the silver Mercedes at the hotel, three gentlemen assisted me in getting my carry-on bag to my room. The receptionists insisted I take a cool washcloth and a glass of champagne to recharge after my flight. I had a butler — yes, a butler — who escorted me through my room, showed me how all the gadgets worked, pointed out the well-stocked snack and mini bars, then snapped on the television embedded in my bathroom mirror — yes, television in my mirror. I was thoroughly impressed.

The room was luxurious, with embossed carpeting, a neutral palette, a bed so comfortable I never wanted to leave it, and a shower I wanted to spend the rest of my life with. Can you marry a shower? I never did get around to soaking in that deep tub, but, had I desired it, my butler would have drawn the bath for me. This was a dream come true.

The St. Regis hotels were founded in 1904 by Colonel John Jacob Astor IV in New York City, and from the start, the whole concept was elegance, innovation, and glamour. Case in point: Astor had a butler, so everyone should have one. Thus, every St. Regis Hotel offers butlers for their guests; some hotels only offer them from suite level up, but both Mexico City and Punta Mita provide butlers for every guest of the hotel, in every room level, for every man, woman, and child. It’s a bit decadent, but when it came time to pack for my departure and I knew I could call on my butler to handle that task, I was sold. How can I travel without one now?

Catering to a mostly business clientele, the St. Regis Mexico City has just about everything you need under one roof: a fitness center, the relaxing Remède Spa, and five restaurants (the Diana Restaurant, J&G Grill, King Cole Bar, La Table Krug, and Candela Romero). Any day you can start off by eating the chicken chilaquiles at Diana Restaurant is a good day. But the biggest selling point is the St. Regis’s location on the Paseo de la Reforma. It is a quick two miles to Chapultepec Castle, and the Diana the Huntress fountain is a stone’s throw from the hotel doors. There is a multitude of small restaurants and shops in the vicinity. With about 300 museums the city has to offer, you’ll never be bored. Add to that the flourishing gastronomy in Mexico City right now and you’ll find more to do than time allows.

If you don’t have a plan, don’t fret. The St. Regis offers a 48 Hours in Mexico City package, catering the experience to your desires.

“The 48 Hours in Mexico City package is designed to afford our loyal guests the most convenient and exclusive way to discover the best aspects of our city’s rich history and burgeoning cultural renaissance in just 48 hours,” said Bernard de Villèle, General Manager. “Mexico City is constantly transforming in exciting ways. With so much to see and do, The St. Regis Mexico City has revitalized the package, affording our guests unique access to a new selection of the city’s best museums, shopping, dining, and attractions.”

For more information about the 48 Hours in Mexico City package, or to make reservations, visit www.stregis.com/mexicocity or call 888-625-5144.

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