Seared Tuna With Sun-Dried Tomato & Jalapeño Preserves

This seared tuna makes a striking, sophisticated main course. The spicy preserves are bursting with layers
of flavors...
Staff Writer

Kate Sears

This is the Seared Tuna With Sun-Dried Tomato & Jalapeño Preserves dish from The New Kosher cookbook.

This seared tuna makes a striking, sophisticated main course. The spicy preserves are bursting with layers
of flavors from the bold sun-dried tomatoes, the zesty basil, and the sharp garlic. I often prepare the preserves a day or two in advance and store them
in the fridge. I also like to serve this dish as an appetizer by reducing the quantity of tuna. (I still make the same amount of preserves, however, as they always get devoured!) For less spicy preserves, remove and discard the seeds from the jalapeño. If you have more preserves than you need for this dish, they will keep in a tightly capped jar in the fridge for up to one week. Just be sure to serve them at room temperature, not straight out of the fridge.

6
Servings
155
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 1/2  Cup  drained oil-packed
  • 2  Cups  fresh basil leaves
  • 1  Cup  fresh mint leaves
  • jalapeño chile, stemmed and halved lengthwise
  • large clove garlic
  • 3  Tablespoons  extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1  Tablespoon  balsamic vinegar
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • tuna steaks, about six ounces each,
cut into two-by-four-inch pieces
  • 1  Tablespoon  neutral-flavored oil, such as avocado, sunflower, or canola

Directions

In a food processor, combine the sun-dried tomatoes, basil, mint, jalapeño, and garlic. Pulse until the ingredients are finely chopped. Add the olive oil, the vinegar, and a quarter teaspoon each of salt and pepper. Process for a few seconds to combine, adding more oil if needed to achieve a good consistency.

Transfer the preserves to a bowl or glass jar and set aside.

Season the tuna with salt and pepper. In a large sauté pan, heat the neutral-flavored oil over high heat. Working in batches to avoid crowding, add the tuna and sear, turning once, for one minute per side. Transfer to a cutting board and let rest for three minutes.

Cut the tuna against the grain into thin slices. Arrange the tuna slices on a serving platter and drizzle with the preserves. Serve at room temperature.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
10g
14%
Sugar
3g
3%
Saturated Fat
1g
4%
Cholesterol
24mg
8%
Carbohydrate, by difference
6g
5%
Protein
11g
24%
Vitamin A, RAE
181µg
26%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
12mg
16%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
283µg
100%
Calcium, Ca
121mg
12%
Choline, total
34mg
8%
Fiber, total dietary
1g
4%
Fluoride, F
1µg
0%
Folate, total
47µg
12%
Iron, Fe
2mg
11%
Magnesium, Mg
53mg
17%
Manganese, Mn
1mg
56%
Niacin
4mg
29%
Phosphorus, P
119mg
17%
Selenium, Se
15µg
27%
Sodium, Na
19mg
1%
Water
100g
4%
Zinc, Zn
1mg
13%

Tuna Shopping Tip

Seafood shopping is quite easy in the general sense. Rule of thumb: if it smells fishy, don't buy. Fresh seafood should smell mild and more like the ocean and sea water rather than fish.

Tuna Cooking Tip

Looking for a quick mid-week dinner? Seafood is a safe bet. It's quick to cook and simple recipes can get dinner on the table in 20 minutes.

Tuna Wine Pairing

Most white wines (especially albariño) and rosé with most fish dishes. Muscadet, sancerre, or New Zealand sauvignon blanc with cold fish dishes; chardonnay, pinot gris/grigio, or pinot blanc with grilled or roasted fish; sauvignon blanc or gewürztraminer with baked fish; grüner veltliner with fish pâté; vintage or non-vintage champagne or sparkling wine with light fish dishes; fino or manzanilla with small fried fish; junmai, junmai-ginjo, or junmai-daiginjo with teriyaki fish.