Sausage, Egg and Cheese Fried Rice

The sausage, egg, and cheese on a roll is one of those iconic New York foods that, unlike pizza slices, bagels, and...
Staff Writer
Sausage, Egg and Cheese Fried Rice

William Hereford

Sausage, Egg and Cheese Fried Rice

The sausage, egg, and cheese on a roll is one of those iconic New York foods that, unlike pizza slices, bagels, and dirty-water dogs, you only really get to know if you live here. In that way, it’s like the bodega itself. In fact, the moment I felt like I’d become a real New Yorker was the night I rolled into my bodega and the guy behind the counter finished my order for me. I go, “Sausage, egg, and cheese ...” And before I could finish, he chimes in “... salt, pepper, extra ketchup.”

The sandwich, along with its brother, the bacon, egg, and cheese, is generally known as a breakfast sandwich, even though you can order it anytime. I mostly ate it at night on the way back from going out after my shift. It helped me maintain my girlish figure. It became a daily part of my diet the way my mom’s fried rice once was. For me, combining the two wasn’t a stretch — I just swapped one carb for another. You won’t believe how good it is until you try it. My recipe is just a jumping-off point. At Talde, I use Filipino longaniza as the sausage, but any flavorful variety works. You could go Mexican with chorizo and then do Chihuahua cheese instead of American. You could use hot Italian and throw in some bell peppers with the onion and swap in provolone. The only rules are: (1) You’ve got to have hot sauce or something to cut the richness; and (2) Lord help you if you let American cheese cool. It melts like no other, but when it gets cold, it’s like silly putty.

Excerpted from the book ASIAN-AMERICAN by Dale Talde with JJ Goode. Copyright © 2015 by Dale Talde, LLC. Reprinted by permission of Grand Central Life & Style. All rights reserved.  

4
Servings
473
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 3  Tablespoons  vegetable oil
  • 1/2  Pound  raw sausage, such as longaniza, breakfast, chorizo, or Italian, casings removed if necessary
  • 1/2  Cup  red onion, diced
  • large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 4  Cups  cooked jasmine rice or Chinese takeout white rice, preferably day-old
  • thin slices yellow American cheese, torn in half
  • 2  Teaspoons  Kosher salt
  • 1  Teaspoon  ground white pepper
  • 2  Tablespoons  scallions, thinly sliced
  • Hot Sauce, or Garlic-Chile Vinegar, to taste

Directions

Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large, wide, heavy skillet over medium-high heat until it shimmers. Add the sausage and cook, stirring occasionally and breaking up chunks, until it’s cooked through, about 5 minutes. Stir in the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until it’s translucent, about 3 minutes.

Beat the eggs with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Push the sausage mixture to one side of the skillet and add the egg mixture to the other. Let the egg cook without stirring just until it begins to set around the edges, about 15 seconds.

Drag a spoon or spatula through the eggs to move them around as they cook (but don’t scramble them) for about 15 seconds more, then stir everything together and cook, stirring frequently, just until the egg has fully set. Increase the heat to high, then add the rice, cheese, salt, and pepper. Cook, stirring and flipping the ingredients constantly and breaking up any rice clumps, until the rice is hot and the cheese has fully melted, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the scallions.

Eat immediately with the hot sauce or vinegar.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
6g
9%
Sugar
9g
10%
Saturated Fat
1g
4%
Cholesterol
6mg
2%
Carbohydrate, by difference
93g
72%
Protein
11g
24%
Vitamin A, RAE
2µg
0%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
5mg
7%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
9µg
10%
Calcium, Ca
53mg
5%
Choline, total
8mg
2%
Fiber, total dietary
5g
20%
Fluoride, F
5µg
0%
Folate, total
5µg
1%
Iron, Fe
2mg
11%
Magnesium, Mg
110mg
34%
Manganese, Mn
4mg
100%
Phosphorus, P
294mg
42%
Selenium, Se
1µg
2%
Sodium, Na
42mg
3%
Water
158g
6%
Zinc, Zn
3mg
38%

Sage Shopping Tip

Keep both fresh herbs and dried herbs on hand. Dry herbs will last a long time, while fresh herbs have a short shelf-life.

Sage Cooking Tip

If you want the flavor of herbs in your food without the actual pieces, wrap them in cheese cloth and cook; discard before eating.

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