Pan-Fried Duck Breast, Orange-Infused Celeriac, and Candied Kumquats

Pan-Fried Duck Breast, Orange-Infused Celeriac, and Candied Kumquats
Staff Writer
Pan-Fried Duck Breast, Orange-Infused Celeriac, and Candied Kumquats

Djamel Dine Zitout

Pan-Fried Duck Breast, Orange-Infused Celeriac, and Candied Kumquats

This is my take on duck à l’orange. Although very different from the classic dish, it uses similar flavor combinations. Celeriac is one of my favorite vegetables, especially with a splash of lemon. During the winter, I use a lot of citrus fruit to add sparkle to a dish. The candied kumquats provide a fragrant combination of acidity and sweetness. Magrets are the big, meaty breasts of moulard ducks (which are raised for foie gras). Or, if necessary, substitute 4 smaller breasts from Pekin (Long Island) or Muscovy ducks and adjust the cooking time accordingly. — Greg Marchand, Frenchie

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2
Servings
1084
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Notes

Excerpted from Frenchie: New Bistro Cooking by Greg Marchand (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2014. Photographs by Djamel Dine Zitout.

Ingredients

For the candied kumquats

  • 7  Ounces  kumquats
  • ¾  Cup  granulated sugar
  • Scant ½  Teaspoon  coarse sea salt
  • star anise
  • Juice of 1 lemon

For the braised and puréed celeriac

  • celeriac
  • 1½  Cup  orange juice
  • 2  Teaspoons  unsalted butter
  • thyme sprig
  • 2  Cups  whole milk, or as needed
  • bay leaf
  • Salt
  • Juice of 1 lemon, or to taste

For the port sauce

  • 2  Cups  port
  • ¼  Teaspoon  fennel seeds
  • ¼  Teaspoon  coriander seeds
  • Dash of  sherry vinegar

For the duck breasts

  • magrets (Moulard duck breasts), about 1 pound each
  • Salt
  • 1  Teaspoon  unsalted butter
  • clove garlic, crushed
  • thyme sprig
  • rosemary sprig
  • Freshly ground black pepper

To finish

  • Fleur de sel
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • A few dill sprigs

Directions

For the candied kumquats

Put the kumquats in a medium-heavy, nonreactive saucepan, cover with cold water, and bring to a boil, then drain in a colander and cool under cold water. (This will help remove some bitterness from the fruit.)

Halve the kumquats lengthwise and remove the seeds. Put them back in the pan and add the sugar, salt, star anise, and water just to cover. Bring to a simmer and simmer very gently for about 45 minutes, adding a little water if needed to keep the kumquats covered, until the peel is very tender. Remove from the heat and remove the star anise.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the kumquats to a blender, preferably a heavy-duty one. Add some of the poaching syrup and purée, adding more poaching syrup as necessary. Mix in the lemon juice. Set aside.

For the braised and puréed celeriac

Trim the celeriac and peel it. Cut a 1-inch-thick slice from the center of the celeriac and cut it into 6 wedges. Reserve the remaining celeriac for the purée.

Put the celeriac wedges in a small nonreactive saucepan and add the orange juice, butter, and thyme. Bring just to a simmer and simmer gently for 20 to 25 minutes. Check a wedge with a knife: if the knife goes in effortlessly, it’s done. Set aside in the cooking liquid.

Cut the remaining celeriac into ½-inch cubes. Put in a medium saucepan and add enough milk to cover, then add the bay leaf and a pinch of salt. Bring to a simmer and simmer gently until the celeriac is very tender, 25 to 30 minutes.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the celeriac to a blender and purée, adding a little bit of the cooking liquid if needed. Season with salt and a squeeze of lemon juice. Set aside.

For the port sauce

Meanwhile, combine the port and seeds in a medium saucepan, bring to a boil, and boil until reduced to a syrupy consistency, 20 to 25 minutes. Season with a dash of sherry vinegar, strain into a small saucepan, and set aside.

For the duck breasts

Trim the duck breasts, removing the excess fat and the strip of sinew from each one. Score the skin and fat with the tip of a sharp knife in a crisscross design, making sure not to pierce the meat. (This will help the fat to render.) Season with salt on the skin side only.

Heat a large skillet over high heat until very hot, then add the breasts skin-side down and cook over low heat, carefully removing the melted fat along the way, until the skin is browned and crispy, 8 to 10 minutes. Add the butter, garlic, and herbs and turn up the heat so the butter foams. Season the flesh side with salt and pepper, then turn the breasts over. Cook, basting with the butter and fat, for about 30 seconds for very rare, or about 2 minutes for just rare. Transfer to a rack and let rest for 15 minutes in a warm spot.

To finish

While the duck rests, reheat the celeriac purée, braised celeriac, and sauce. Once the braised celeriac is warm, remove it from the pan and keep warm, then boil the cooking liquid to reduce it slightly.

Spoon some celeriac purée onto each plate in a swirl. Add a spoonful of candied kumquat purée and a wedge of braised celeriac, topped with some of the reduced cooking liquid.

Slice the duck breasts and arrange them on the plates. Season each with a pinch of fleur de sel and pepper. Finish with the sauce and the dill sprigs.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
72g
100%
Sugar
27g
30%
Saturated Fat
41g
100%
Cholesterol
274mg
91%
Carbohydrate, by difference
58g
45%
Protein
55g
100%
Vitamin A, RAE
742µg
100%
Vitamin B-12
3µg
100%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
113mg
100%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
10µg
11%
Calcium, Ca
1639mg
100%
Choline, total
74mg
17%
Fiber, total dietary
9g
36%
Fluoride, F
85µg
3%
Folate, total
99µg
25%
Iron, Fe
3mg
17%
Magnesium, Mg
122mg
38%
Niacin
3mg
21%
Pantothenic acid
2mg
40%
Phosphorus, P
916mg
100%
Riboflavin
1mg
91%
Selenium, Se
35µg
64%
Sodium, Na
1431mg
95%
Vitamin D (D2 + D3)
3µg
20%
Water
464g
17%
Zinc, Zn
6mg
75%

Duck Breast Shopping Tip

Take a break from the usual chicken dinners and pick up a duck from your local butcher. Though it may not have as much meat as a chicken, the flavor of duck is unique and well worth a try.

Duck Breast Cooking Tip

Like with all poultry, make sure you wash everything the meat touches with hot water and soap!

Duck Breast Wine Pairing

Chenin blanc with cream soups; pinot noir, gamay, grenache, or other light red wines with tomato-based soups, including tomato-based seafood soups; sercial or bual madeira or fino or manzanilla sherry with consommé or black bean soup; amontillado with black bean soup.