Lamb Ragù

Lamb Ragù
Staff Writer

Napa Valley Grille

A seasoned chef and Wolfgang Puck Worldwide alum with more than 17 years of culinary experience, chef Taylor Boudreaux displays a straightforward approach with all his recipes, with an emphasis on local and seasonal. While always keeping in mind composition and the interplay of flavors on the plate, this hearty lamb ragù intertwines rustic flavors revamping a conventional dish with untraditional wild game. 

8
Servings
158
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • One  4-pound lamb shoulder, boned, rolled, and tied
  • All-purpose flour, for dusting
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 3  Cups  red wine
  • 2  Cups  finely diced onion
  • 1  Cup  finely diced celery
  • 1  Cup  finely diced carrots
  • can crushed San Marzano tomatoes
  • 1 1/4  Cup  tomato juice
  • sprigs fresh thyme
  • bay leaves
  • 1  Pound  fresh pappardelle pasta
  • Pinch of  red pepper flakes
  • 1/2  Cup  chopped parsley
  • 1  Tablespoon  unsalted butter
  • Olive oil
  • Freshly grated Parmesan cheese, for garnish

Directions

Cut off the netting on the lamb and remove all the silver skin. Dice the lamb into ½-inch pieces. Leave some of the fat on the meat for some extra flavor. Any good butcher will do this for you upon request. Season the meat well with salt and fresh ground pepper. Dust with all-purpose flour until there is no more visible moisture.

Heat a large sauté pan and add ½ cup of the olive oil. Shake off excess flour and sear the lamb in small uncrowded batches. Remove when well caramelized on all sides and allow allow to drain its excess fat on a plate lined with a paper towel. Lamb should be visibly crispy, but not burnt.

When all the lamb is cooked, deglaze the pan with the red wine and let it reduce by half. 

In a separate pot, sweat out the onions, celery, and carrots with 1 tablespoon of the oil for about 5 minutes until lightly caramelized. Add in the red wine reduction from the sauté pan and follow with the tomatoes, tomato juice, herbs, and the cooked lamb. Simmer, covered, on low heat for about an hour or until the lamb is tender. A good test is to take a piece and if you can "smush" it with the back of a spoon with very little force on the countertop it’s done.

Season the ragù with salt and pepper. If the sauce is too thick, add a little chicken stock. If it's too thin, reduce it a little more uncovered. Remove the bay leaves and set aside until ready to use. 

In a large pot of boiling water, cook the pappardelle until al dente. In a separate sauté pan, heat up 2 cups of the ragù. Add the red pepper flakes and the butter. Stir until butter is emulsified into the sauce. Add the fresh chopped parsley, and season with salt and freshly ground pepper to taste. Toss the cooked pasta in the sauce and grate fresh Parmesan on top.
 

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
3g
4%
Sugar
13g
14%
Saturated Fat
1g
4%
Cholesterol
11mg
4%
Carbohydrate, by difference
25g
19%
Protein
8g
17%
Vitamin A, RAE
221µg
32%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
25mg
33%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
16µg
18%
Calcium, Ca
113mg
11%
Choline, total
17mg
4%
Fiber, total dietary
4g
16%
Fluoride, F
12µg
0%
Folate, total
54µg
14%
Iron, Fe
2mg
11%
Magnesium, Mg
21mg
7%
Niacin
3mg
21%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
110mg
16%
Selenium, Se
8µg
15%
Sodium, Na
648mg
43%
Water
154g
6%
Zinc, Zn
1mg
13%

Lamb Shopping Tip

Look for meat that is bright red. Red meat turns paler as the hemoglobin within releases oxygen – a sign that the meat has been sitting too long at the butcher's counter.

Lamb Cooking Tip

When browning meat, resist the urge to move the meat – you must allow a flavorful crust to form over high heat. Once it has formed, the meat should slide freely with the shake of a pan.

Lamb Wine Pairing

Most red wines, especially cabernet sauvignon, but also including cabernet franc, mourvèdre, Rhône blends, zinfandel, petite sirah, nebbiolo, nero d'avola, primitivo, barbera, and sangiovese.