Brûléed Ribs

Try these Brûléed Ribs from expert grillmaster Clint Cantwell
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Brûléed Ribs

Clint Cantwell, grillocracy.com

Brûléed Ribs

Smoked ribs get a sweet makeover today with a crunchy layer of bruleed sugar, creating the perfect balance of sweet and savory.

This recipe is courtesy of Clint Cantwell, grillocracy.com

4
Servings
181
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • racks St. Louis spare ribs
  • 2  Tablespoons  yellow mustard
  • Your favorite BBQ dry rub seasoning, to taste
  • 3/4  Cups  sugar, seperated
  • 2  Tablespoons  water

Directions

Prepare the smoker or grill for indirect cooking.  Add 3 to 4 chunks of your favorite smoking wood to the charcoal briquettes and adjust the grill vents to bring the temperature to 250 degrees F.

Remove the membrane from the bone side of the ribs.  Rub the ribs with the mustard then season both sides liberally with BBQ dry rub.  Place the ribs on the smoker or grill.

Cover and allow the ribs to smoke for approximately 5 to 5 ½ hours until tender (note: when done, ribs will pull away from the bone slightly and will bend at a 45 degree angle when held with tongs).

Remove the ribs from the smoker and set on a sheet pan or wooden cutting board.  Combine 1/2 cup sugar and water in a small bowl and blend well to make a sugary paste.  Use a pastry brush to coat the top side of the ribs with the sugar mixture (note: add a small amount of water to the mixture if the mixture doesn't spread evenly).

Sprinkle remaining sugar over the top of the ribs then use a kitchen torch to heat the sugar until is begins to boil but before it begins to burn.  

Allow the sugar to cool completely (the sugar should create a hard shell on the ribs if properly brûléed.  If note, simply torch the sugar for another 1 to 2 minutes).  Slice and serve the ribs immediately.  

* For indirect cooking on the grill, place a water filled aluminum half pan in the center of the charcoal grate and place preheated charcoal briquettes on each side of the pan.  Set ribs directly above the water pan and adjust the vents according to the recipe.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
11g
16%
Saturated Fat
4g
17%
Carbohydrate, by difference
27g
21%
Protein
2g
4%
Vitamin A, RAE
10µg
1%
Calcium, Ca
11mg
1%
Choline, total
2mg
0%
Fiber, total dietary
6g
24%
Folate, total
21µg
5%
Iron, Fe
1mg
6%
Magnesium, Mg
8mg
3%
Niacin
1mg
7%
Phosphorus, P
29mg
4%
Selenium, Se
3µg
5%
Sodium, Na
117mg
8%
Water
13g
0%

Rib Shopping Tip

Most cattle are fed a diet of grass until they are sent to a feedlot – where they are finished on corn. When possible, choose beef from cattle that are “100% grass fed” - it will be more expensive, but better for your health.

Rib Cooking Tip

The method used to cook beef is dependent on the cut. Cuts that are more tender, like filet mignon, should be cooked for a relatively short amount of time over high heat by grilling or sautéing. While less tender cuts, like brisket and short ribs, should be cooked for a longer time with lower heat by braising or stewing.