Pappardelle alla Boscaiola Recipe


Nutrition

Cal/Serving: 703
Daily Value: 35%
Servings: 4

Balanced, High-Fiber
Dairy-Free, Egg-Free, Milk-Free, Peanut-Free, Tree-Nut-Free, Soy-Free, Fish-Free, Shellfish-Free, Alcohol-Free
Fat29g45%
Saturated4g20%
Carbs93g31%
Fiber6g25%
Sugars7g0%
Protein18g37%
Sodium758mg32%
Calcium38mg4%
Magnesium83mg21%
Potassium725mg21%
Iron3mg14%
Zinc3mg17%
Phosphorus339mg48%
Vitamin A228IU5%
Vitamin C5mg9%
Thiamin (B1)0mg11%
Riboflavin (B2)0mg26%
Niacin (B3)6mg32%
Vitamin B60mg22%
Folic Acid (B9)43µg11%
Vitamin B120µg0%
Vitamin D0µg0%
Vitamin E4mg22%
Vitamin K33µg41%
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated20g0%
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated4g0%
Have a question about the nutrition data? Let us know.

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Pappardelle alla Boscaiola
France Ruffenach

The phrase alla boscaiola translates to “in the style of the woodsman.” To be honest, I don’t think I’ve ever met a woodsman, but there is a lovely woodsy quality about this dish: broad ribbons of pappardelle or fat bucatini noodles (your choice) tossed with meaty, rosemary-scented mushrooms and finished with a snowy shower of pecorino cheese. I especially like to use leftover Ragù all’Aburzzese for this recipe, because the sauce, which is richly flavored with beef, lamb, and pork, adds an extra dimension of flavor.

5
Ratings4

INGREDIENTS

  • ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 large cloves garlic, lightly crushed
  • 8 ounces mixed fresh mushrooms, trimmed (see Cook’s Note)
  • 8 ounces fresh shiitake mushrooms, trimmed and sliced
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary
  • ½ cup smooth tomato sauce
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or fine sea salt, or to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 pound dried pappardelle or bucatini
  • Freshly grated pecorino romano cheese for serving

DIRECTIONS

Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil and salt generously.

Place the olive oil and garlic in a large, deep frying pan over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic, stirring occasionally, for 3–4 minutes, or until fragrant but not browned. Add all the mushrooms and rosemary. Raise the heat to medium-high and cook the mushrooms without turning them for about 2 minutes, or until they are browned on the underside. Toss and then cook them for another 2 minutes or so before tossing them again. Continue to cook the mushrooms in this way for about 15 minutes total, or until they are golden brown. Remove and discard the garlic.

Stir in the ragù and reduce the heat to medium-low. Add the salt, season with pepper, and stir in the parsley. Turn off the heat and cover the pan to keep the mushrooms warm.

Add the pasta to the boiling water, stir to separate the noodles, and cook according to the manufacturer’s instructions until al dente. Drain the pasta in a colander set in the sink, reserving about 1 cup of the cooking water.

Transfer the pasta to the frying pan and gently toss the pasta and sauce to combine  thoroughly, adding a splash or two of the cooking water if necessary to loosen the sauce. Transfer the dressed pasta to warmed shallow individual bowls and sprinkle with the cheese. Serve immediately.

Recipe Details

Cook’s Note: I like to use less-common varieties of mushrooms, such as brown clamshell, chicken-of-the-woods, gamboni, and trumpet. For brown clamshells and other mushrooms that are sold in “clumps,” pull the mushrooms apart at the base. If they are large and thick, cut them into slices; if they are thin, you can leave them whole. What you are aiming for in the sauce is a mix of sizes and textures.

 

Adapted from "The Glorious Pasta of Italy," by Domenica Marchetti (Chronicle Books, 2011).

Servings: 4

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