People Who Follow the Mediterranean Diet Could Slow Aging Process by Five Years

Staff Writer
People Who Follow the Mediterranean Diet Could Slow Aging Process by Five Years
Stock up on tuna, salmon, and fresh vegetables if you want your mind to stay young.

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Stock up on tuna, salmon, and fresh vegetables if you want your mind to stay young.

Scientists have found more evidence that point to the Mediterranean diet as a very healthy choice, and not just a persisting trend. The Mediterranean diet emphasizes consumption of fish, vegetables, healthy fats and oils like olive oil, and whole grains.

Researchers at Columbia University have found that people with diets rich in fish and fresh vegetables could stave off aging by as much as five years.  People who eat less meat and dairy have bigger brains on average, and experience a slower aging process.

“These results are exciting, as they raise the possibility that people may potentially prevent brain shrinking and the effects of ageing on the brain simply by following a healthy diet,” said the lead author, Yian Gu, of Columbia University in New York.

The study documented 674 people with an average age of 80 and found that the brains of those who followed most closely the Mediterranean diet were 13.11 milliliters greater than that of those who had not done so.

The researchers emphasized that the study was not conclusive evidence of the diet’s preventative measures against mental aging, but that it does suggest at least an association.

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