Mushroom Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine Could Treat Obesity

Mice who were treated with the mushroom gained less weight than their control counterparts when fed a high-fat diet
Mushroom Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine Could Treat Obesity
Wikimedia Commons/Eric Steinert

The research suggests that the active prebiotics may be used to ‘produce a specific gut microbiota associated with reduced weight gain, inflammation, and insulin resistance in obese individuals.’

The research suggests that the active prebiotics may be used to ‘produce a specific gut microbiota associated with reduced weight gain, inflammation, and insulin resistance in obese individuals.’

Ganoderma lucidum, a mushroom commonly used for “health and longevity” within traditional Chinese medicine, might also be a useful tool in the treatment of obesity, suggests new research published in the Nature Communications journal.

In a study conducted on mice, the mushroom was found to have a positive impact on gut bacteria, limiting the amount of weight gain and fat-accumulation from a high-fat diet, as well as reducing inflammation — which has been linked to insulin resistance, Type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease, cardiovascular disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and cancer.

These issues are of concern, the scientists write, because “The high prevalence of obesity is currently a major threat to public health, with [approximately] 500 million obese people and 1.4 billion overweight individuals worldwide,” and therefore, “prevention of obesity thus represents a major challenge for modern societies.”

Although more research must be conducted on human subjects, scientists are optimistic about  Ganoderma lucidum’s application in the prebiotic treatment of “weight gain, chronic inflammation, and insulin resistance in obese individuals.”

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