Carl’s Jr. Introduces All-Natural Turkey Burger Line

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The turkey patties are made from turkeys raised without antibiotics
Carl's Jr. Turkey Burger

Image courtesy of Carl’s Jr.

This ‘better-for-you’ burger option comes in three varieties, all at 500 calories or less.

Carl’s Jr., the first major fast food chain to launch all-natural beef patties, now introduces the industry’s first all-natural turkey burger line, according to a release. The all-natural, quarter-pound patties are made from turkeys raised without antibiotics.

The burgers are offered in three varieties, all at 500 calories or less: Original, Jalapeño, and Teriyaki. They are served on a toasted honey wheat bun, but customers can also order the burgers as lettuce wraps. The Original All-Natural Turkey Burger features a turkey patty with special sauce, mayonnaise, lettuce, red onion, tomato, and dill pickle chips. The Jalapeño All-Natural Turkey Burger is a turkey patty with spicy Santa Fe sauce, sliced jalapeño, pepper-Jack cheese, red onion, tomato, and lettuce. Lastly, the Teriyaki All-Natural Turkey Burger includes a turkey patty with teriyaki sauce, grilled pineapple, Swiss cheese, red onion, tomato, and lettuce.

Brad Haley, chief marketing officer for Carl's Jr., says, “[A]s we confirmed with our introduction of the industry-first All-Natural Burgers last year, people aren’t just looking for fewer calories today, they’re also looking for cleaner food. So, in response to that, Carl’s Jr. is proud to now offer All-Natural Charbroiled Turkey Burgers – made from turkey that has never, ever received antibiotics. So, whether you prefer charbroiled, all-natural beef or turkey burgers, Carl’s Jr. is this only major fast food chain in the country that has you covered.”

Carl’s Jr. All-Natural Turkey Burgers are now available at participating restaurants beginning at $4.49 for the burger and $6.99 for a combo meal.

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