Bill de Blasio: Food Stances to Expect From the Mayor-Elect

New York City's mayor-elect just donated a truffle to a high school. What next?
Staff Writer
What should we expect in food law with mayor-elect Bill de Blasio?

Last we heard, mayor-elect Bill de Blasio was donating an $8,000 truffle to a New York City high school. But what's going to happen to Mayor Bloomberg's crusade against giant sodas?

Turns out, de Blasio will continue fighting the good fight, promising recently to keep Bloomberg's top battles, including the appeal of a court rejection of the soda ban.

This has been his stance since the campaigning days. "I believe the mayor is right on this issue," he said in October. "We are losing the war on obesity ... It’s unacceptable. This is a case where we have to get aggressive."

De Blasio's policy, it seems, is to focus on health initiatives and decrease inequality. He received an $8,000 truffle, only to donate it to the Food and Finance High School in Manhattan. He showed up at New York Communities for Change, calling for higher living wages for fast-food workers. And in past debates, de Blasio has campaigned for increasing enrollment to the SNAP program, making school breakfasts universal, focusing on local produce in school cafeterias, and investing money in school food programs. This means you might be seeing more programs like Edible Schoolyard in New York's public school system.

All of this is, of course, a way to merge "two New Yorks" into one, taxing top earners to expand pre-kindergarten programs, increase affordable housing, and more. And while New York has to wait until January to see whether he follows through on his promises, we can always count on de Blasio ordering black olive pizzas from local Park Slope joint Smiling Pizza. Unless he moves to Gracie Mansion, that is.

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