M&M's Production Waste Turning Honey Blue and Green

It's, um, good for Halloween? No
Staff Writer

Photo Sasabune Omakase Modified: Flickr/erin/CC 4.0

Honey fiends should probably ration their jars; not only are bees slowly getting killed off (and thus ruining our chances of making the perfect watermelon sorbet), but some beekeepers have noticed their honey turning unnatural shades of blue and green. That's not a good thing.

According to Reuters, beekeepers in France have noticed their honey turning blue and green, after bees returned to their hives with "unidentified colorful substances." Apparently, the beekeepers are blaming M&M's, since a Mars plant producing M&M's was processing their waste some 2.5 miles away.

There are some 35,000 colonies in the town of Alsace, which produces about 1,000 tonnes of honey a year, Reuters reports. Union head Alain Frieh notes that this is the latest problem in the honey industry, following high bee mortality rates. The M&M's-infused honey, however, does still taste like honey, but won't be on markets. "For me, it's not honey. It's not sellable," said Frieh. As we mentioned, it might be good for holidays, but we still don't want to know what's in there.

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