Japan

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A guide to Japan's sake-producing regions

Photo Sasabune Omakase Modified: Flickr/erin/CC 4.0

Hokkaido

Japan's northernmost prefecture and second-largest island. A source of quality sake, as well as Sapporo beer.

Akita

In northwestern Honshu, Japan's largest island, the source of aromatic Akita Komachi rice and of quality sake.

Niigata

This prefecture in western Honshu, Japan's largest island, is the home of Japan's most expensive and highly regarded rice, Uonuma koshihikari, and is a source of quality sake.

Hiroshima

In southwestern Honshu, Japan's largest island, this prefecture — historically tragic as the site of Hiroshima City, the first target for America's atom bomb, in August of 1945 — today produces quality sake, and is the site of the annual Saijo Sake Festival, at which more than 900 sakes from all over Japan are served.

Tottori

A prefecture in southwestern Honshu, Japan's largest island, Tottori is a major rice-producing region, and a source of quality sake.

Iwate

This large prefecture in northeastern Honshu, Japan's largest island, produces quality sake.

Osaka

Located in southern Honshu, Japan's largest island, and home of the gastronomic capital of Osaka city, this prefecture is a source of quality sake.

Shimane

This prefecture in southern Honshu, Japan's largest island, is a source of quality sake.

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