Introducing the New Tullamore D.E.W.

The Irish whiskey is getting a makeover
Staff Writer

The Drink Nation/ Tullamore D.E.W. Facebook

The new Tullamore D.E.W. redefines Irish whiskey.

Tim Herlihy is fine with Irish stereotypes, provided they’re the right ones. As brand ambassador for Tullamore D.E.W., his aim is not only the obvious task of getting us all to drink more whiskey, but also to convince us that "Irish True" is more about Colin Farrell than finding a pot o’ gold at the end of the rainbow.

It’s a tall order, but the young man is up for the task, and he certainly knows his whiskey. Then again, it’s his job, and an envious one at that. Tim travels the United States hosting events such as a recent "Toast & Taste," where guests were treated to the full range of Tullamore D.E.W. offerings to celebrate "Halfway to St. Patrick’s Day," or what we at The Drink Nation like to call "Any Excuse to Drink Day."

Drinkers who are only familiar with the original Tullamore D.E.W. might not realize the company also offers several aged whiskeys. The 10 Year Single Malt is aged in four different types of casks before bottling (bourbon, sherry, port, and Madeira). American and Spanish oak barrels are used to give the triple-distilled 10 Year Reserve its flavor, and the 12 Year Special Reserve spends time in bourbon and sherry casks as well.

"It’s half education and half entertainment," Herlihy says of the events. "Edu-tainment, if you will. We talk about Tullamore’s history, offer up a few toasts, and discuss the flavor profiles of each of our liquids. We want folks to enjoy whiskey as much as we do."

When asked the proper way to do so, the response is as expected. "There’s little etiquette involved in drinking Irish whiskey, which means that there’s no room for snobbery. Rocks, neat, mixed, whatever. You should be able to enjoy it how you want to enjoy it." 

— Marcos Espinoza, The Drink Nation

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