French Wine Cooperative Declared National Heritage Site

Staff Writer
The architecture of this wine cellar and shop has made it the first cooperative to be national heritage
Cave de Tavel

Cave de Tavel

The Cave de Tavel is situated on 680 hectares and produces 2.5 million bottles of rosé each year.

Of course a French wine cooperative would be declared part of the country’s national heritage.

Les Vignerons de Tavel is a cooperative cellar in the rosé-only appellation of Tavel, according to Decanter.com. As of June, it became the first wine cooperative in France to be declared national heritage due to its protected, historic architecture. According to a French governmental website of administrative acts, the title was officially made on June 17 and includes the part constructed in 1937, as well as the new façades and roofs added in 1942 and 1964. The director of the cooperative, Christian Paly, told Decanter.com that they hope this will bring in indirect revenue. “This will also help us continue to strive for excellence with our vineyards and wines,” Paly says, “and will help protect the area around the cellar against any unwise urban development.

The cooperative receives 30,000 visitors per year to its 680 hectares of vines, which produce 2.5 million bottles of wine each year.

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