Foodies in Fiction

Staff Writer
Foodies in Fiction

The Children’s Books

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Mouse: Everyone knows from our childhoods what will happen If You Give a Mouse a Cookie thanks to Laura Numeroff. This book simply wouldn’t be the same without the temptation of that delicious cookie because nothing else is as wonderful as food.

Sam: Doctor Seuss knows what’s up in his novel Green Eggs and Ham as he encourages kids to try out foods that are foreign to them and to stop being such a Sam.

The Moody Drinkers

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Holden Caulfield: J.D. Salinger’s classic novel The Catcher in the Rye is either the bane of the literary world or its savior (depending on who you talk to). Yet, one thing is certain: the main character, Holden, is one moody son of a gun. He claims that his favorite foods are strawberry daiquiris and soda, which isn’t too weird for a 17 year old kid with a some seriously strange tendencies.

Alex (DeLarge): Anthony Burgess hit a homerun into the darkest depths of the human capacity for evil in his novel A Clockwork Orange. In the dystopian novel, Alex and his friends drink milk that they lovingly call “Moloko” simply because the bar could not serve minors if they sold alcohol. While this may not sound sinister, the novel as a whole will make anyone with a glass of milk look like  a truly sociopathic individual.

The Still Moody but Slightly More Mature Drinkers

Photo by Daniel Schuleman

Photo by: Daniel Schuleman

Jay Gatsby: F. Scott Fitzgerald is often accredited with writing the American novel, The Great Gatsby. While serving out gallons of champagne and hundreds of roasted turkeys at his  parties, Jay waits on his dock hoping that Daisy will find her way to his “humble” mansion. Maybe he should take a page out of Tom’s book and buy her some fried chicken while intimately discussing how to cover up manslaughter.

Jake Barns: Although anyone in any of Ernest Hemingway’s novels is probably an alcoholic, none are so famous as the characters in The Sun Also Rises. Jake spends the entire novel  drunk, traveling off wine and beer whilst lamenting constantly about his debilitating impotence. I’m not a doctor, but I can’t imagine that all of the alcohol would help his healing process.

 

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