We're Halfway to St. Paddy's Day: 9 American-Irish Beers Worth Trying from We're Halfway to St. Paddy's Day: 9 American-Irish Beers Worth Trying Slideshow

We're Halfway to St. Paddy's Day: 9 American-Irish Beers Worth Trying Slideshow

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We're Halfway to St. Paddy's Day: 9 American-Irish Beers Worth Trying

The Irish Red Ale originated in Ireland. The small amount of roasted barley in this brew gives it a glorious reddish hue, which some American brands have even tried to duplicate with dye! They won’t fool the most dedicated drinkers, though — because everyone knows it’s the taste that matters. If you’re drinking a true Irish Red Ale, your beer will taste malty, hoppy, and refreshing.

Another common Irish brew is a Dry Irish Stout. Stouts usually have a light body, low carbonation level, and they’re served on a nitro system, in order to create a creamy effect on the beer. Irish stouts tend to be bitter because of the roasted barley and hefty helpings of hops, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t absolutely delicious.

When you drink an Irish beer, you’re drinking a blend like no other. Their rich, dark, malty flavors come together to create an Irish aroma that is utterly cozy and perfect for the chilly weather. Because of this, American breweries everywhere are duplicating the qualities of a true, Irish beer — this way, it doesn’t matter where you are. With American-Irish blends, beer lovers of all kinds can enjoy the unique qualities of an Irish blend whenever you’d like!

There will always be classic Irish brands like Guinness, but have you ever tried dabbling into an Irish brew from a local brewery?  A handful of American companies providing their beer in darker tones, with a malty texture and a smooth aftertaste — just like the Irish like em’. Whether it be a bigger brand like Samuel Adams, or a local brewery like Brooklyn Brewery, each company has its own take on an Irish blend that set them apart from the rest.

Fruity, hoppy, malty, you name it — here’s 10 Irish beers that are definitely worth trying.