This Is the Only Way to Wash Fruit

Hint: You’ve been doing it wrong
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According to the CDC, foodborne illnesses affect nearly 46 million Americans each year, and cross-contamination is one of the most common causes for an outbreak.

 

Do you always wash your fruits before eating them? Be honest. It seems reasonable to dust off an apple in a hurry, and I bet you rarely think about scrubbing that cantaloupe before you slice it open.  According to the CDC, foodborne illnesses affect nearly 46 million Americans each year, and cross-contamination is one of the most common causes for an outbreak.

Click here for the 5 tips for washing fruit (slideshow).

Proper hygiene and handling of food in the kitchen can go a long way in protecting both you and your dinner guests from food poisoning. Still, not all contaminants can be washed off once they have made their way into your porous produce.

In any event, it never hurts to handle your raw fruit with care to ensure the safety of your friends and family, but cleaning it properly isn’t exactly as simple as it sounds. A debate involving the efficacy of tap water over vinegar has led to multiple studies being conducted to decide the absolute best way to wash your fruit.

The long and winding road that delivers your fruits from the field to the grocery store includes several points of potential contamination, which makes these five steps for washing fruit vital in ensuring your family ingests the nutrients and not the pesticides, insects, and pathogens lurking on that apple.

Presoak Vegetables

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If you loathe the waxy exterior on fruits like apples and pears, pre-soak them in equal parts cold water and vinegar in a shallow tub or bowl for about 10 minutes. This technique will remove the artificial wax and any residual dirt so you can enjoy your fruit as Mother Nature intended.
 
Wash Under Clean Running Water

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A 2005 study that looked into different vegetable- and fruit-washing techniques concluded that thoroughly washing fruits under potable running water was effective in removing salmonella from the surface of the produce.

Angela Carlos is The Daily Meal’s Cook Editor. Follow her on Twitter @angelaccarlos.

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