Boston’s Best Resources For Finding Pet Play Groups

Boston’s Best Resources For Finding Pet Play Groups
You’ve probably heard new parents fretting about making sure their kid gets the right kind of socialization. Well, pets are no different. Getting a chance to run around with other well-behaved dogs makes not only for a happy pup but for a happy owner as well. Bonding over your love for four-legged beasts is a great way for you to meet new people and make new connections outside of your usual circle of friends and co-workers. But you might be at a loss as to how to find a pet playgroup in your area. Try these resources if you’re looking for a good one in Boston.
Peter’s Park Dog Run
1277 Washington St.
Boston, MA 02118
www.PetersPark.org

Dog parks are natural meeting grounds for dog owners. Lots of local doggie playgroups meet up at Peter’s Park Dig Run. And this park in particular is well suited for it. It has a fenced-in area for smaller dogs so if you have a little guy or girl you don’t have to worry about how they’ll interact with their larger cousins all afternoon. The park is open year round, which is a nice bonus for playgroups, but the doggie water fountains are turned off in the winter months so be sure to bring a bottle of water to keep Fido hydrated.

puppy1 Bostons Best Resources For Finding Pet Play Groups

(Credit, Renee Mallett)

MSPCA Angell
350 S. Huntington Ave.
Boston, MA 02130
(617) 522-7400
www.MSPCA.org

Animal rescue groups are a great resource for finding pet playgroups in your area. And in Boston that usually means MSPCA Angell. Even if the shelter or rescue group doesn’t host their own playgroups, they will have plenty of information on places that do. If you are looking for something a little more structured and very reputable, as opposed to a neighborhood playgroup, go right to the source and ask the local shelter which playgroups they know of and recommend.

Related: Boston Area’s Best Petting Zoos

(Image: iStockphoto)

(Image: iStockphoto)

The Pawsitive Dog
274 Southampton St.
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 541-1000
www.ThePawsitiveDog.com

Dog trainers are another great resource for finding puppy playgroups in the city of Boston. Some, like The Pawsitive Dog, go a step further and even host their own meet-ups. Socialization and real world interaction are such an integral part of their training process that they hold regular field trips, meet-ups and events for their clients and their owners to get out and have fun. Past meet-ups have involved bringing your wonderfully trained pet to Fenway to cheer on the Sox and a doggie pool party so the pups could beat the heat.

(Image: iStockphoto)

(Image: iStockphoto)

D’Tails Pet Boutique
482 Columbus Ave.
Boston, MA 02118
(857) 233-2672
www.dtails-boston.com

Pet playgroups aren’t just for shelters and vets offices. With the number of specialty boutiques that cater to pet owners on the rise, so are the number of stores that offer playgroups for pets. D’Tails is a premier pet boutique in Boston’s South End neighborhood that now offers doggie playgroups. Their playgroups act more like doggie daycares; you can drop your pet off and let him play all day. D’Tails really shines as a spot for playgroups because they even offer the convenience of pick-up and drop-off service, making it just that much easier for you to find a way to get some social time for your dog.

Related: Best Shopping in Boston’s South End

(Image: iStockphoto)

(Image: iStockphoto)

The Dogfather
51 N. Margin St.
Boston, MA 02113
(617) 227-2212
www.DogFather.com 

Another great way to find a playgroup is to ask your groomer. You may even luck out and discover that they, like the North End’s Dogfather, host playgroups themselves. Nothing beats the ease of being able to drop your pet off to be bathed, shaved and have their nails clipped – and to know they are getting some great playtime in the rest of the day. With hours ranging from eight in the morning to seven at night, you can do double duty and have all of your pet’s needs taken care of for you while you’re at work.

Renee Mallett is the author of several books about art, culture, and New England. She was the owner and director of an art gallery and has written about arts and entertainment on a national level for several print and online journals. Her work can be found at Examiner.com.