Top Rated Stir Fry Recipes

chicken
Thick & spicy pound of chicken breast or white meat 2 Tb salt three teaspoons of chili sauce --- cooking cuisine:Step 1 : The southwestern Chinese like to eat Sichuan cuisine, which impresses people, both famous and profound, with its thick spicy sauce.Step 2 : Clean the white meat and chop into pretty small piecesStep 3: Cooking peanuts and scallions as the decorations, cooks put them in the bottom of the bowl and then put the chicken and seasoning on the top.Step 4: Let’s wait for 10-15 minutes.Step 5 : Please, Eat! There is a folk idiom in China, “Hunger breeds discontentment.” According to my great grandfather, Chinese traditional cooking methods originate from oral records between young people and their teachers. The southwestern Chinese like to eat Sichuan cuisine, which impresses people, both famous and profound, with its thick spicy sauce.Because of the humid climate, cooks will prepare a lot of hot seasoning and fillings with their food. They eat a lot of fish and meat, and hot seafood is the staple in people’s lives. The most common public food in the Sichuan province is Kong Pao Chicken, the hottest food in China. This name comes from a historical personage Gong Pao, one of the most famous philanthropists in the Qing Dynasty, who always helped others and shared his money with the poor. Everyone knew his best food, stir-fried chicken, so they cooked the chicken with some hot seasoning, and gave a special name to remember this person. If you want to get more detailed information, please visit my food blog: www.ningweiwangfood.simplesite.com
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4.9

Three Peas with Barley, Chile, and Green Garlic
Pea shoots are the young, tender tips and vines of the snow pea or the sugar snap pea plant. Once your plants are established and producing an abundance of pods, clip off leaf and tendril sections about 4 inches long. If you don’t have your own plants, look for these tender shoots at farmers’ markets or Asian grocery stores. Sambal oelek (or ulek) is an Indonesian chile paste, and tart, citrusy Kaffir lime leaves are used in Southeast Asian cooking. Look for both products in Asian markets. Click here to see 'Kitchen Garden Cookbook' Offers Help with Growing Produce at Home.
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4

Corn Cobs in Tangy Peanut Masala
I love corn in most guises, but few dishes are as delicious as this. The cobs are enrobed in a tangy, tomato-based curry laced with crushed roasted peanuts, adding texture and flavor. The result is absolutely delicious and the dish easy to make. I normally eat the cobs with my fingers and mop up the sauce with Indian breads, but if that feels awkward, use corn kernels instead of cobs and eat the dish with a knife and fork. Click here to see Indian Cooking, Simplified.
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4

Moo Shu Pork Recipe
This popular dish is often served at Chinese restaurants with hot pancakes or crepes. It's easier to make at home than you think — and you can even replace the pork with chicken or shrimp. Hoisin sauce is the key to this dish with its depth of color and sweet and salty taste. It can be found in the Asian section of your grocery store.
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4

Chinese Crackling Scallion and Garlic Sauce
In some ways, this recipe epitomizes my passion for simple, fresh sauces. It’s just hot oil infused with garlic and chiles and loaded with sliced scallions. It’s served crackling hot, poured straight from a wok onto whole fish, grilled steaks, roasted potatoes, or even bowls of plain rice. I call it “Chinese” because it reminds me of some of my favorite dishes. It’s part sauce, part condiment, and part stir-fry. The steely perfume of a hot wok or cast-iron skillet is an important ingredient in this preparation. I’ve made this with just about any greens I’ve had on hand. Try it with chopped ramps, kale, bok choy greens, arugula, or garlic chives. Chopped romaine lettuce works too.Make sure all of the ingredients are ready before you start. This is a last-minute preparation that is best made and served immediately.
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4

San Choy Bow
I love so many Asian flavors and textures, and this dish is no exception. This recipe contains a blend of ground pork and chicken; alternatively, you could use all chicken, all pork, or all beef. (That said, I do prefer the flavor that’s derived from using half pork and half chicken.) The addition of shiitake mushrooms, water chestnuts, bean sprouts, and lettuce adds refreshing textural elements and enhances the dish’s flavor profile. This can also be served as an appetizer. — Chef Jason Roberts, Good Food Fast.
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4

bibimbap
By
Bibigo’s mission is to introduce the delicious and nutritious Korean food culture to the rest of the world. Bibigo gets its name from a mash-up of Korean bi-bi-da (“to mix”) and English “to-go,” reflecting both its food and social characteristics. Its Traditional Bibimbap recipe allows people to conveniently bring authentic Korean flavors into their own home. Just add your favorite protein and vegetables, and you have the perfect meal in a few steps!Substitute the bulgogi and/or dried shitake mushrooms with your favorite choice of protein and vegetables to personalize each bowl of bibimbap.This recipe is provided by Bibigo.
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4

Mexican Fajita Pie
“It’s easy to run to a local restaurant when the Mexican craving hits, but if you get that craving as often as I do, you need a solid homemade recipe go to. This Mexican Fajita Pie is loaded with protein from two types of beans (black and refried), whole wheat tortillas, and sharp Cheddar. Bell peppers spiced with oregano, cumin, and chili powder add a boost in flavor and texture. The result? One serious fix for your Mexican craving.” — Katie Parker, author of The High-Protein Vegetarian CookbookClick here for more of our best fajita recipes. 
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4

Curry Udon
There's nothing like a bowl of udon noodles in hot soup to bring comfort in cold weather. This one is flavored with blocks of readymade Japanese curry, soy sauce, and scallions. Sure, you could just go out and get some Curry Udon, but once you try this recipe, you'll see how easy it is just to make it at home.
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3.5

General Tso's Chicken
Deep-frying is a method I prefer to avoid for everyday cooking, but this is one of the dishes for which I make an exception. When served, it tends to provoke that moment of rapt, intense silence at the dinner table that is one of the tokens of true appreciation. Slices of chicken thigh meat are first deep-fried in a light batter, then tossed in a sophisticated sweet-sour sauce laced with chile. General Tso's chicken is supposedly a Hunanese dish, but it's virtually unknown in Hunan Province. It was actually invented by Peng Chang-Kuei, a Hunanese exile chef in Taiwan, and cooked by him in his one-time New York restaurant. It has since been taken so much to the heart of Americans living in the northeast that it is now known as the very essence and emblem of Hunanese cuisine. This version of the dish is based on the recipe I learned in Peng Chang-Kuei's kitchen in Taipei. The dish is usually made with boned chicken leg meat, although you can use breast if you prefer. Do make sure your wok is stable before using it for deep-frying: it's important to use a wok stand with a round-bottomed wok. Click here to see Regional Chinese Cooking Made Easy.
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3.301585

Cantonese Sticky Rice wrapped in Lotus Leaves
This dish is served at dim sum, a traditional way of eating that dates back to the Ch'in Dynasty with royal origins. At least, that's how one version of the story goes. Another, equally compelling tale revolves around the Silk Route; more than 1,000 years ago, roadside tea houses used to serve small plates of food with tea to weary travelers. Whichever tale you believe doesn't change the fact that this is a delicious snack to serve with tea.
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3

Originally eaten by Buddhists in Chinese culture, this dish is served in most Chinese households during the first few days of the new year. There are regional differences depending upon which part of China your family originates from, but most of the dried ingredients remain consistent since they symbolize good luck. A number of the ingredients like the black fungus (fat choy), lily buds (jinzhen), and gingko nuts (bai guo) all symbolize wealth and good fortune. Eating vegetarian the first day of new year also symbolizes purification of the body and upholds the tradition of having no animal slaughter on the first day of the new year.Authentically, this dish contains 18 ingredients. The number symbolizes wealth and prosperity. The stew requires quite a bit of time for reconstituting, boiling, and braising. Most of the prep time is spent rinsing and soaking dried ingredients and then slowly braising the ingredients until the flavor melds.Click here to see The Ultimate Chinese New Year Dinner.
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2.4