Top Rated Sole Recipes

Sole
A French-inspired recipe for sole from George Rector, a famous American restaurateur from the late 19th to early 20th century.  Click here to see more recipes from George Rector. 
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5

Sole and Shrimp
When my daughters were little we lived for a time in a beautiful old building high on top of one of San Francisco's famous hills. My brother, my Aunt Cele and Uncle Warde, and my young family had apartments there. Often, we all ate together and since I was hungry to learn my way around the kitchen, I watched all my aunt’s moves — she was a wonderful, simple, and stylish cook. Cele marketed every day; I think she liked the social aspect of her errands. She would pull on her gloves, a smart coat, and with a quick wave to my uncle, off she’d skip down Washington Street’s steep hill to Polk Street to buy what she needed for dinner that evening. If we were lucky it would be petrale sole and bay shrimp — simple and stylish. Now I live on the East Coast so I cook grey sole and the smallest shrimp I can find to relive the flavor of those fun family meals.— CH Click here to see Shrimp Recipes for Any Day of the Week Adapted from "Canal House Cooking Volume No. 5" by Melissa Hamilton and Christopher Hirsheimer.
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5

This is a simple, clean-tasting, elegant, old-fashioned dish. The delicate flavors are best appreciated with a simple accompaniment, such as white rice, or alone in a meal of a few courses. For instance, start with Handmade Egg Noodles tossed with butter, herbs, and Sautéed Mushrooms then serve this stuffed sole all by itself; then serve a green salad with sliced oranges and Citrus Vinaigrette. For most occasions, I like this sole unadorned with any sauce besides the pan juices. But on occasions when a sumptuous sauce is appropriate, try using a lemon butter sauce. Adapted from "The Commonsense Kitchen" by Tom Hudgens. 
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5

Sole Meuniere
Sole filets drizzled with brown butter, parsley, and lemon juice make a chic, delicious dinner.This recipe is courtesy of Barefoot Contessa.
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4.5

"The Sicilians have a tradition of using breadcrumbs in many of their recipes, like involtini di pesce spada, or swordfish rollatini, which are dressed with dried- oregano- seasoned breadcrumbs and olive oil. It makes sense that the large Sicilian immigrant population in the States would keep up the tradition here using fillet of sole, an easier, more economical catch than swordfish, especially for the early immigrants." —  Lidia Bastianich
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4.5

Looking to cut down on fat and calories? Cooking food in a packet is one of the best ways to keep the flavor locked in, and cleanup couldn't be easier.
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4

Healthy baked sole with tomatoes and basil
Easy, peasy, fast, fresh and easy baked sole piled high with flavorful tomatoes and basil.
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4

Baked sole
This is one of the simplest ways of cooking fish and, if your fish is spankingly fresh, there is no better way to cook a flat fish in my very humble opinion. The salsa verde is fabulous drizzled over baked fish, but equally good served with broiled chicken or as a dip with vegetable crudités. It’s a great stand-by sauce or dip because it will last for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.
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4

Filet of Sole
Marco Polo Ristorante's chef and owner, Marco Chirico, has shared his recipe for his Filetto di Sogliola alla Pernod dish, which is featured on his Thanksgiving menu.  
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4

Lemon Sole
Lightly breading the sole gives this tender fish a slight crunch when you take a bite and also makes pan-searing the fillets easy, with little risk of a sticking-to-the-pan problem.
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3.32323

Lemon Sole with Lobster Sauce For the sole: 16 potatoes 2 egs 1 tbsp. melted butter salt a little bit of the cooking water 2 1/2 lbs. lemon sole filets 10 1/2 oz. baby shrimp For the sauce: 1 onion 1 tsp. melted butter 1 1/4 c. water 1 1/4 c. dry white wine 4 tbsp. lobster stock 1 cup half-and-half 3 tbsp. cornstarch 4 tsp. cognac salt and lemon pepper, to taste Heat oven to 400 F. Peel and cut the potoates into small pieces. Boil them until tender in lightly salted water. Pour the water from the potatoes, reserving some of it, and mash the potatoes with a potato masher. Beat the eggs lightly and blend them into the mashed potatoes along with the butter. Season to taste with salt. If needed, add a bit of the cooking water to the mashed potatoes to reach your desired consistency. Roll up the fish filets with their dark sides facing inward. Sprinkle with salt, add a little bit of wine, and place in the oven for 6-8 minutes. Remove from the oven and let the filets cool. Place the fish in the middle of an oven-safe casserole and place the shrimp atop.  Place mashed potatoes in a pastry bag and use them around the fish, filling up all the empty space in the pan. Turn oven heat up to 475 F. Mince the onion and fry it in butter. Add water, wine, stock, and cream. Bring to a boil and add corn starch, whisking constantly until sauce is thickened. Add salt, lemon pepper, and cognac. Pour the sauce over the fish and shrimp. Bake in the oven for 10 minutes. Serve hot.  
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3.088235