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Top Rated Shakshuka Recipes

Shakshuka Recipe
The name doesn’t really roll off the tongue on a hungover morning but this recipe, which uses a combination of eggs and spicy tomato sauce — similar to the Mexican huevos rancheros, though with a distinctively North African/Middle Eastern flavor — offers a memorably fiery blast-off to a day that might otherwise have proved drab and dull.Shakshuka is usually thought of as an Israeli breakfast dish, but in fact is eaten widely in Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, and Yemen too. The only slightly unusual ingredient is the smoked paprika, which gives the tomato sauce a wonderful smoky richness.This version is quite spicy; if you prefer a milder dish, you can halve the quantities of jalapeño, pepper, and paprika. Click here to see the Eating Your Way Out of a Hangover story. 
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5

Shakshuka
A simple, spicy, herby sauce is combined with almond milk for a creamy, fragrant shakshuka base.This recipe is courtesy of Pinch of Yum.
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2.5

by
angelo2
This recipe is my fathers version of shakshuka.It comes from Egypt where he was born but of Italian and french parents( undoubtedly their spin on it) I have always liked this dish and so do my children now.....''Dad, Dad make the shakshuka please".( when they visit me ).
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by
Ilysse
I've seen other recipes for Shakshuka on here but none just like this one so I thought I'd post. This is from Joan Nathan.
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by
Mirj
This is a creamy Israeli sauce perfect for a light lunch or supper. My kids adore it over mashed potatoes. I adore it with a healthy dose of Tabasco sauce.
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by
Kumquat the Cat's friend
An Israeli dish served at Ori Apple, a hummus restaurant on St. Marks Place in Lower Manhattan. An "eat anytime" dish. From an article in the Wednesday food section of the New York Times.
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by
Joan Nathan
In 1930, Simon Agranat, the chief justice of the Israeli Supreme Court, wrote to his aunt and uncle in Chicago: "I had my eighth successive egg meal during my three-day journey through the Emek (the valley)." Eggs have always been a main protein for the people in Israel. When I lived in Jerusalem, I would make for my breakfast—or even for dinner—scrambled eggs with sauteed spring onions, fresh herbs, and dollops of cream cheese melted into the eggs as they were cooking. Probably the most popular egg dish in Israel is shakshuka, one of those onomatopoeic Hebrew and North African words, meaning "all mixed up." The most famous rendition of this tomato dish, which is sometimes mixed with meat but more often made in Israel with scrambled or poached eggs, is served at the Tripolitana Doktor Shakshuka Restaurant in Old Jaffa. Doktor Shakshuka, owned by a large Libyan family, is located near the antique market in an old stone-arched building with colorful Arab-tiled floors. "When I was a young girl at the age of ten I liked to cook," said Sarah Gambsor, the main cook of the restaurant and wife of one of the owners. "My mother told me that I should marry someone who has a restaurant." And she did just that. Mrs. Gambsor, a large woman who clearly enjoys eating what she cooks, demonstrated that the dish starts with a heavy frying pan and tomato sauce. Then eggs are carefully broken in and left to set or, if the diner prefers, scrambled in as they cook. The shakshuka is then served in the frying pan at the table.
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by
AniSarit
Delicious typical Israeli breakfast, that really can be eaten as lunch or even dinner! Sauce can be made in a advance to be reheated at the time that eggs are done. In this recipe, I've reduced the amount of oil used to make it low fat, but you can use more if you need to.
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by
chacha
We love this recipe. It's an old favorite.
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by
Lisa
Eggs poached in a mildly spicy tomato sauce and served with pita bread are a popular Middle Eastern breakfast.
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by
marlotcomm
Wonderful comforting Israeli dish which may be enjoyed either for breakfast or dinner. I especially like this recipe because it is rare to find healthy comfort food. Enjoy!
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by
Milton Crawford
The name doesn’t really roll off the tongue on a hungover morning but this recipe, which uses a combination of eggs and spicy tomato sauce — similar to the Mexican huevos rancheros, though with a distinctively North African/Middle Eastern flavor — offers a memorably fiery blast-off to a day that might otherwise have proved drab and dull.Shakshuka is usually thought of as an Israeli breakfast dish, but in fact is eaten widely in Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, and Yemen too. The only slightly unusual ingredient is the smoked paprika, which gives the tomato sauce a wonderful smoky richness.This version is quite spicy; if you prefer a milder dish, you can halve the quantities of jalapeño, pepper, and paprika. Click here to see the Eating Your Way Out of a Hangover story. 
0