Top Rated Pork Adobo Recipes

by
Max Falkowitz
Adobo is more a cooking style than a recipe. Pork, chicken, fish, beef, or pretty much any protein you want can be adobo'd. Some cooks swear by coconut milk, others consider it verboten. You can add coriander, cumin, and chiles (smoked or fresh), or just stick to classic bay leaf, as I've done here. Even the inclusion of soy sauce is negotiable. There are few rules with adobo, and fewer agreements about what constitutes it. The big non-negotiable is a hefty dose of vinegar. Coconut or palm vinegar is traditional in parts of the Philippines, but hard to find even in Asian groceries. Rice vinegar works just fine. Adobo of course should be served with plenty of rice. Any leftover gravy and rice makes an amazing breakfast.
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by
Marcia Kiesel, Food & Wine APRIL 1998
Adobo, the national dish of the Philippines, starts out as a garlicky and tangy stew. The meat is then removed from the casseroles and fried until crisp, and the cooking liquid is reduced to make the richly flavored sauce.
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by
Recipes Network
Chicken Or Pork Adobo
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by
Tonkcats
Try Pork Adobo II from Food.com. - 3414
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by
LikeItLoveIt
Try Chicken or Pork Adobo from Food.com. - 14048
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by
Wilhelmina
The stew is slightly tart, but you can adjust exactly how tart by using more or less vinegar. I generally use more than soy, but my children like lots of "juice" so I add more soy to taste. Also, I tend to use jarred, minced garlic in place of fresh to save some time. The original recipe does not include onions or noodles and calls for boiling/simmering all the main ingredients until done and then straining the meat out so that you can brown it and thicken the sauce. Lungkow Vermicelli is bean thread noodles. I buy them at my local Asian store. 1 bundle is generally 1.3 ounces, but they come in packages of I think 8 bundles. They don't really have a taste on their own, but they soak up the flavor of the stew, and my kids love slurping them up.
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by
PaNdAcUtEs
Simple and delicious filippino dish. I recomend you eat it over a bowl of white rice.
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by
lotsapots
Quick, easy and delicious meal.
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In the Philippines, pork or chicken is the most common main ingredient of adobo, but seafood, vegetables, and even mushrooms may also be used.
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by
Marcia Kiesel
Adobo, the national dish of the Philippines, starts out as a garlicky and tangy stew. The meat is then removed from the casseroles and fried until crisp, and the cooking liquid is reduced to make the richly flavored sauce.
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by
CobaltBlueMixer
Filipino Pork Stew to accompany Steamed Rice and some type of vegetable.
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by
Tonkcats
Try Pork Adobo from Food.com. - 3413
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