Top Rated Mexican Recipes

Antonio’s Roast Chicken
This recipe is from Are We Having Any Fun Yet? by Sammy Hagar. Copyright © 2015 by Sammy Hagar. Reprinted by permission of Dey Street Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.
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4.5

Andy Boy
These healthy Broccoli Rabe and Black Bean Quesadillas are perfect for anyone who's looking for a vegetarian Mexican treat.Special diet note: This recipe is vegetarian as written, and can be made gluten-free if you use gluten-free tortillas.This recipe is provided by Andy Boy.
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4.5

Mole Poblano
  Mole (pronounced MOH-lay) Poblano is upscale Mexican sauce that's piquant with a hint of chocolate and a slight sweetness that is typically reserved for festivals and holidays. There are as many Mole Poblano recipes as there are Mexican grandmothers (and home chefs) but the core ingredients are similar. If you like mole sauce, you should add my recipe to your "must make" list.    My Chicken in Chocolate and Chile Sauce (Mole Poblano de Pollo) went from "what you've got now isn't edible" to "this is great" "definitely make it again". My husband normally is quite supportive of my recipes but I admit he was right. The "classic" recipe I modified and eventually abandoned called for bittersweet chocolate and an overpowering amount of cloves which had ruined this gorgeous sauce. That is until I made a mid-course correction.    Chicken or the more traditional bird for a mole, turkey, is cooked until tender in water while the sauce is made. I cleaned several ancho chiles and soaked them in homemade chicken stock, and measured out the almonds (some combination of almonds, peanuts, pumpkin seeds and/or sunflower seeds is traditional), onions, tomatoes, raisins, sesame seeds, and garlic .These are all the ingredients of a Mole Poblano.I threw the mixture into the blender jar and whirred it into a thick creamy sauce before putting it into a large skillet and cooking it down. The most important ingredient is chocolate which is unsweetened or bittersweet. I prefer to use fair trade and organic chocolate. Be careful not to burn the chocolate -- keep the flame low.   Most recipes include a tortilla that's been broken up or pieces of stale white bread that gets blended into the sauce as a thickener.   In my research I found wild variation from recipe to recipe on spice measurements. Cinnamon is common to most and so are ground anise or fennel seeds. I had anise and ground it in a spice mill along with all the other spices listed in the recipe. I share with you that recipes vary with 1/4 to 1 teaspoon of each spice per five cups of liquid which is made up primarily of tomatoes and chicken stock. I made a good guess that 1/2 teaspoon of each spice was a perfect compromise. Slightly less common are coriander seeds, many recipes include fresh cilantro and cloves (I recommend 1/8 of a teaspoon - no more!). Of the dozens of recipes I read, one included allspice berries   After adding the chocolate, my sauce lacked any hint of sweetness.  It was downright bitter and uber clovey. In coming up with a game plan for "fixing" the ruined sauce, I had to think on my feet. More tomato would dilute the clove, check, a little sugar would sweeten the bitter chocolate flavor, check, and peanut butter, yes peanut butter, would help neutralize the bitterness even more.  After adding more pureed tomatoes, I added sugar and peanut butter just one tablespoon at a time tasting between each addition. The recipe below is the perfect combination of piquant and slightly sweet (at least according me my husband's and my palettes).
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4.4

Posole
Posole is a Mexican stew made with pork and hominy in a rich, flavorful broth. A pressure cooker cooks the pork quickly, intensifies its flavor, and makes it meltingly tender. However, you can just as easily simmer it away in a heavy pot for a few hours if you prefer. Everyone can enjoy customizing their bowls with the assortment of accompaniments. — Curtis Stone, Good Food, Good Life.
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4

Quail, Chorizo, Bean, And Heirloom Avocado
This recipe for quail cooked in a sous vide machine use all the classic flavors and ingredients found in traditional Mexican cookery, but in a highly refined way.Adapted from Mexico from the Inside Out by Enrique Olvera
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4

“I really like this salad for its simple ingredients, but also for its complex variations between technique, texture and temperature, says chef Chad Clevenger of Alma Cocina, a Latin American and Mexican-inspired restaurant in downtown Atlanta.   Recipe By: Chef Chad Clevenger of Alma Cocina
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4

"Suizas" means Swiss in Spanish — and it’s thought that when people from Switzerland immigrated to Mexico, they brought their love of dairy with them, explaining why so many Mexican dishes are heavy on the cheese. These enchiladas are a little lighter than normal — but they still pack a strong flavor punch.
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4

Guacamole Sur
Manny Flores, director of operations at Richard Sandoval’s La Sandia in Santa Monica says grasshoppers or “chapulines” are very common in Mexican cuisine. Walk in any food or farmers market and you’ll see many kinds of insects from grasshoppers to agave worms and ant larva. “We decided to highlight the grasshopper in our guacamole because they are very common in the south of Mexico.”  The all natural, sun-dried grasshoppers are tossed with dried chili and salt to add to their flavor.  They add spice, earthy tones, and texture to foods and as toppings. Click here to get more recipes for your Cinco de Mayo celebration!  
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4

When he was growing up in Mexico City, chef Alfredo Solis enjoyed Pan de los Muertos at his aunt’s annual Dia de los Muertos feast.
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4

Chico's Tacos Flautas Recipe
It was more than a decade ago that I fell in love with the flautas at Chico's Tacos in El Paso, Texas. That visit started a craving that was finally, finally sated, in New York City no less. Chico's Tacos were brought back from Texas, special delivery, packaged in Tupperware that was more expensive than the actual tacos, frozen until I could get to them, and finally reconstituted (Thanks, Mom). Eating Chico's Tacos once again did two things. First, it made the need to be able to eat them more consistently a necessity. Second, tasting the original rendition reestablished the flavor profile required to be able to do that. Crispy fried taquitos, covered in thinly shredded cheese, and drenched in red watery sauce — dripping, crunchy, melted cheese-drink-the-sauce flautas goodness. Creating a recipe for a renowned dish is tricky. You can theorize, you can do trial and error, or you can do what was done here: Look to see what's out there already. There's no official site for Chico's Tacos and, as far as anyone can seem to tell, no officlal recipe out there for how to best make these signature tacos. The two most prominent recipes out there are by The Stanton Magazine and Mexican American Border Cooking. They provide some really insightful guidance on different possible approaches to a successful dish. This recipe uses a home fryer and fresh ingredients for all components for a rendition that looks and tastes pretty close to the original. Oh, and don't forget the toothpicks. You need them to keep the taquitos closed when frying them. (If anyone knows a better way, please chime in.)  
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3.416665

Wow. This soup was incredible! It kind of reminds me of the chicken tortilla-type soup you would get at an authentic Mexican restaurant. The aroma when I walked in was so fragrant! The best part of this recipe (besides how mouthwatering it was), is that it's so easy and it doesn't take much time at all to put together. I would like to thank my friend Scarlett for providing me with the inspiration for the recipe I present to you today. I put my own twist on it to make it into a soup I could cook all day instead of for just four hours. See all slow cooker recipes. Click here to see The Ultimate 1-Pot Meal Roundup.   Click here for more of the 101 Best Slow Cooker Recipes  
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3.310345

Seafood Chile Relleno
This twist on the traditional Mexican stuffed chile is rich, creamy, and delicious, filled with a medley of seafood — here I use shrimp, calamari, and bay scallops — instead of the usual ground beef. This was one of the first items on the menu at Maya, and it remains a popular item to this day.
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3.25