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Top Rated Merguez Recipes

Merguez Sausage
You may well find the Mediterranean spicy sausage dish addictive. It is important to set aside the browned vegetables separately, as they are cooked in layers later. Try to turn them over in step 3 in one piece; if this seems unlikely, leave them alone. They will still taste fantastic.
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Merguez, Kale, and Sweet Potato Frittata
Whether you're entertaining two or 10 around the holidays, it's hard to beat a frittata when it comes to serving up a hearty and healthy breakfast.  Akin to a large, flat (i.e. unrolled) omelette, frittatas are the perfect brunch item, in my book. It's a vehicle for all sorts of toppings, here salty and spicy merguez sausage, rich green winter kale, chunks of roasted sweet potato, and delicate caramelized onions. All of the ingredients can be prepped in advance, so all you need to do is mix the eggs and add the ingredients about 20 minutes before you want to eat.  This recipe serves two, but it can be easily doubled or tripled to feed your group. Just use a larger sauté pan and be sure to cook the frittata until the center is just set — it will certainly take longer in the oven. Serve with toasted slices of hearty farm bread, fresh butter, and jam. Click here to see Lazy Sunday Brunch Recipes.
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keeney
Fresh and spicy sausages made of lamb and delicately spiced with cumin and hot pepper. I can never seem to find them so usually use the suggested substitute - hot chorizo. Ideal accompaniment to savory tomato jam and sweet mint zuchinni. From Lukin's Celebrate Morocco.
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Sunset OCTOBER 2003
Notes: Harissa-spiced merguez sausages are available from specialty butchers.
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Hank Shaw
Hank Shaw likens sausage-making to jazz: "You have all these standards, but there's room for improvisation." With this spicy merguez from North Africa, adjust the seasonings to vary the flavor intensity and heat.
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Olha
Algerians like their sausage spicy and with an exceptional array of seasonings. The version that follows can be considered medium hot, with pepper and chili providing the heat, while the garlic adds the aromatic richness.
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Da Huz
Delicious beef sausages cooked in a tomato sauce. Adapted from "Tunisia: Mediterranean Cuisine" published by Konemann. This recipe has five separate parts. Please read all the directions before you start cooking. Try to time everything so that they're done at the same time. We got pretty close. Also, traditional cuisine would use preserved lemons, but we tried to make our own preserved lemons and they fermented on us. So fresh works too.
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Pim Techamuanvivit
"David Kinch once said that my meals aren't complete without rice. He's probably right," says Pim Techamuanvivit, who cooks her rice in a clay pot from her native Thailand. Her earthy baked rice, with mushrooms and chunks of the spicy lamb sausage merguez, is a terrific side dish for the lamb chops, but it's also hearty enough to eat on its own.
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Kerry Saretsky
Previously Veal Stew Forestière » All French in a Flash recipes » So long as I've had a spoon in my right hand and a fork in my left, Morocco has meant fire. Not just because my Mémé, with her fiery red hair, was born many decades ago in Casablanca (where, photos inform me, her hair was decidedly brown). But because everything that my French-Moroccan family put on my plate had spice, sass, and heat. In Morocco, spice doesn't only mean chili, although the harissa with which I was anointed is certainly baptism by fire. It means smoky cumin, sweet cinnamon, and allspice. Like my family, Moroccan food is complicated, unruly, exotic, and feisty as hell. Merguez is a Moroccan sausage that my family, when they left France and moved to America, had to recreate from scratch, because truth be told, there is not exactly a large Moroccan market here in the States. Here you don't find merguez at every sausage counter as you do in France, and even in other parts of Europe. Even after Morocco ceased being a French protectorate, Moroccan food continues to pervade French restaurants and markets by the sheer force of immigration and cultural proximity. My favorite way to eat it is the way you often find it in France, especially in the South where I happened upon it maybe too often last summer in Cassis. Merguez Frites: a sandwich of blistered links of merguez nestled into a baguette with mayonnaise or even more harissa and then loads of crispy fresh frites as the thorny crowning glory. Hotter than the sun, to me its summer beach food: irresponsible and sweaty. When I am home in America, I can usually only find merguez at expensive specialty stores, which takes away a lot of its cheap eats street food appeal. For these boulettes, I tried my hand at recreating the sausage with all the same flavors of harissa, nutmeg, allspice, and cinnamon. The combination of hot spices and sweet spices is intensely exotic. If you buy your spices whole and grate the appropriate ones at the last minute, this will be even better. In the picture above, the garlic was chopped, but as the meat shrinks, you can see it becomes obtrusive. So, I recommend grating the garlic. I serve these with a soothing mint sauce made from yogurt and crème fraîche as the perfect spicy cocktail bite. About the author: Kerry Saretsky is the creator of French Revolution Food, where she reinvents her family's classic French recipes in a fresh, chic, modern way. She also writes the The Secret Ingredient series for Serious Eats.
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Caroline Russock
For those with a passion for runny yolks, it doesn't get much better than Shakshuka, that Middle Eastern dish of eggs poached in a spiced tomato sauce. Of course, there is one way to improve on the dish and that would be by adding chunks of Moroccan merguez à la this: Moroccan Merguez Ragout with Poached Eggs from Amanda Hesser's and Merrill Stubbs' The Food52 Cookbook. This ragout has a lot going for it—rich, roasty tomato sauce, fatty, lamby sausage, and runny, perfectly poached eggs that soak up everything that's going on in the pan. The recipe calls for lots of crust bread for sopping but we'd go a step further and steam up a bowl full of couscous to serve alongside, making sure that every last bit of ragout finds a home. As always with our Cook the Book feature, we have five (5) copies of The Food52 Cookbook to give away this week. Adapted from The Food52 Cookbook by Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs. Copyright © 2011. Published by William Morrow. Available wherever books are sold. All Rights Reserved
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Tanya Cauthen
Butcher-shop owner Tanya Cauthen likes flavoring supremely tender braised lamb with a North African spice blend that includes cumin and fennel seeds. Lamb shanks are great for serving at dinner parties, since they look so dramatic, but lamb stew meat—cut from the shoulder or the leg—is equally delicious. Or, for a less gamey flavor, substitute beef short ribs.
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Nigella Lawson(Copyright 2007, Nigella Express, Hyperion, All Rights Reserved)
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