Top Rated Mandu Recipes

Mandu
Mandu are Korean dumplings stuffed with a mixture of various meats and vegetables. There are many variations of mandu. Some classic versions are gogi mandu (which has meat as the main ingredient in the filling), yachae mandu (vegetable), and kimchi mandu. The cooking method also varies. Mandu can be steamed, deep-fried, pan-fried, boiled, or used to make soup. Mandu are usually made in large quantities and frozen for later use. Frozen mandu are easy to prepare as a delicious snack, appetizer, or meal, making it a home-cooked favorite for my two kids away at school. Click here to see Celebrate the Korean New Year.
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Anonymous
Ingredients: MANDU FILLING: 10 ounces firm tofu 8 ounces kimchi minced 12 ounces extra-lean ground beef 2 green onions minced 2 garlic cloves minced 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds 2 teaspoons sesame oil 1 egg white lightly ...
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International Recipes
from USaka Kim II Sung Meat Pie Korean1 pkg. bean cake Tofu brand2 lbs. ground beef3 eggs1 T. Dry onions1 pkg. bean sprouts Tofu brand1 tsp. sesame seed1 tsp. soy sauce1 T. garlic1 tsp. garlic salt1 tsp. onion salt1 tsp. Accent1 tsp. ...
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Chris Young
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International Recipes
from USaka Kim II Sung Meat Pie Korean1 pkg. bean cake Tofu brand2 lbs. ground beef3 eggs1 T. Dry onions1 pkg. bean sprouts Tofu brand1 tsp. sesame seed1 tsp. soy sauce1 T. garlic1 tsp. garlic salt1 tsp. onion salt1 tsp. Accent1 tsp. ...
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J e l i s a
Great finger food for parties-always a hit. Much easier to prepare if you have a food processor.
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anon-r1rnyeh5min4@base.google.com (ifood.tv)
Description How to make Korean mandu (dumplings) and mandu guk (dumpling soup). Ingredients Mentioned in Video Directions Please Follow the Video
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chungclan
Delicious and easy version of the traditional New Year's dish. Korean tradition holds that if you eat this soup on New Year's eve, you'll have plenty to eat all year.
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littlesponger
These dumplings are not only low in fat but also loaded with flavors. I got the idea from meat ball. Why Not with dumpling!!! I made them in round shape like meat ball, roll into the flour and kept them in the freezer. My husband's favorite soup because he doesn't have a feeling of fullness after a meal.
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Chichi Wang
Previously Lotus Root » All Seriously Asian recipes » No, these wontons aren't super-sized. The Chinese make a distinction between "big" wontons, which are made with wrappers filled with meat and vegetables, and "small" wontons, which are filled with only meat and use much thinner wrappers. Caroline's Cook the Book post about Sweet Potato Ravioli using wonton wrappers reminded me that more needs to be said about the goodness and convenience of the wonton. Wontons have always struck me as the unappreciated cousin of the dumpling. Since dumplings are broadly defined as any wrapper and filling combination, wontons are technically a type of dumpling rather than its relative. But I often think of the wonton as distinct because it's considerably easier and more forgiving than the Chinese jiaozi or Korean mandu. In this sense, Japanese gyoza, which are usually referred to as dumplings, have much in common with the wonton because both tend to use thin and more pliant skins. For the home cook, the wonton has two distinct advantages over the thicker flour dumpling. First, while it can be difficult to find a store-bought dumpling skin that has the chewiness and suppleness of the homemade variety, good-quality wonton skins at the store are not much different than what you can make at home. Second, the thinness of the wrapper also makes the cooking process less likely to fail. Judgments about length of cooking time is less crucial for the wonton than the dumpling, since the latter requires that the skin be neither doughy (undercooked) or gluey (overcooked), while wontons will reach a point of doneness and hold that texture for a good thirty seconds, giving the cook much more leeway. And though not all wonton wrappers include the addition of an egg, having that addition yields more pliant and manageable wrappers. (Think about the parallel to the noodle: Just as making flour-and-water noodles can be trying, flour-and-egg noodles are almost always good.) Finally, like dumplings, wontons can be enjoyed in a number of ways: boiled, with a dressing of soy sauce, chili oil, and various other condiments; pan-fried or deep-fried and dipped in sauce; or served in soup broth. When I make wontons I use up at least two packs of wrappers and freeze half the batch. Freezing the wontons makes no difference to their taste and texture, and makes for a quick and flavorful meal on a rainy day. About the author: Chichi Wang took her degree in philosophy, but decided that writing about food would be much more fun than writing about Plato. She firmly believes in all things offal, the importance of reading great books, and the necessity of three-hour meals. If she were ever to get a tattoo, it would say "Fat is flavor." Visit her blog, The Offal Cook.
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